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Blue screen of death: 0167:BFF9DFFF

Posted on 2001-09-11
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I have a Dell Optiplex GX1 running Win98Se.  This is a refurbished PII running a PIII 800 Mhz CPU.  I am only running 4 programs on it, ECS (home automation software), ACE (additional HA software), MS Personal Web Server (from the Win 98SE CD) and RTV Recox (a small utility that "pushes" buttons for me).  The problem is that virtually everytime I exit the Ace program I get a blue screen with the mishap happening at 0167:BFF9DFFF.  Other details:

I just got this machine and all programs have been freshly loaded.
The author of Ace has been helpful in troubleshooting, it is stumped.
I have tried not loading particular elements (like PWS) but this does not seem to help.
Ace uses VB files
I have a Zoom 14.4 modem installed, ATI 3d Rage Pro video card, Integrated 3 com NIC and integrated Crystal audio.
Have fully uninstalled Ace (more than once) and reinstalled.
Intel 440BX chipset
It does not matter how I shut down Ace, I almost always crash. If I just shut down Windows (with Ace running), shut down via the menu, shut down via Ctrl-Alt-Del (to end task), all crash.
My only recovery is to reset or power down.
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Question by:Kuba
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LeeTutor earned 100 total points
ID: 6475471
What type of error is it?  Fatal Exception 0E?  Windows Protection fault?  This info is usually very helpful in tracking down the problem.  

Otherwise, have you tried running the System File Checker to see if any system files are missing or corrupted?  You can run it by typing SFC in the Run dialog box off the Start Menu. Have your Windows installation CD ready to replace any missing/corrupted files.  If you don't have a Windows installation CD, then search to see if the Win98 .CAB files are saved somewhere on the hard drive, for example usually in Windows\Options\Cabs.
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by:LeeTutor
ID: 6475492
I searched the net at Google.com for 0167:BFF9DFFF and found 70-some sites for some kind of error at that address. Here is one of the more likely candidates I found:

http://www.activewin.com/askaw/archive/050401.shtml

using search engine I found an entry that sounds like my problem.

"leave my computer (P3 650mhz 20gig 250mbram) for more than 3 hours it completely freezes up and I get the following message fatal Exception 0E at 0167:BFF9DFFF. ... "

but when I use the link to get to it, I can't find that entry. I would really like to know what the answer was to that problem. I also have machines that get this fatal exception as it just sits there. no screen savers are on and no activity for a period of time. Any info you have would be greatly appreciated.
 
Solution 1 Answered by: Candy Baker
It sounds like a protection fault error with .dll file.  You need to find out why this is happening.  You need to check your energy saving feature setting and make sure none of your power schemes are set to shutdown or go into a stand-by mode.  

Go to Settings > Control Panel > Display.  Open Screen Saver settings.

The schemes include preset time settings that turn off computer components or put your computer in a low-power usage state. You can create your own power schemes or use the ones provided with Windows.

You can also adjust the individual settings in a power scheme. For example, depending on your hardware, you can:

Turn off your monitor automatically. Typically, you would do this for a short period to conserve power.

Put the computer on standby. If you plan to be away from your computer for a while, you put your computer on standby. I suggest you leave this on.

Put your computer in hibernation. You would do this when you?ll be away from the computer for an extended time or overnight. Hibernation turns your computer off, but when you restart the computer, all programs and documents that were open when you turned the computer off are restored on the desktop.

Change the Settings to turn off hard drives never. Turn off monitor never.  System Stand-by make sure it is set to never.  Be sure your screen saver is off and see if this makes a difference.
 
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by:Kuba
ID: 6475537
I *knew* I would forgot some piece(s) of information. The error is Fatal Exception OE.

I forgot all about SFC, I will run that.  I should have also mentioned that I ran Windows Update and installed all needed updates to Windows.

Because the PC is used pretty much round the clock for home automation I don't use any power saving except for the monitor.  I don't think that is an issue as I have been able to cause the errors by rebooting, running Ace and then shutting it down, so APC isn't in play.  Still, if SFC doesn't find anything it cannot hurt to turn it off.
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by:SysExpert
ID: 6475637
I would also suggest checking the BIOS power down options, and make sure OS/2 memory is disabled.

You might look for the newest BIOS, and also try loading BIOS defaults.

It could be a hardware problem on the motherboard, or  a conflict of some kind. IRQ's maybe.

It would not hurt to do a
scanreg /fix

from a DOS prompt.

I hope this helps !
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6477240
Here's a link to the latest BIOS update for that system.  Some of the more recent updates mentioned "CPU microcode updates" which may apply since you're running a P-III in a P2 board.

http://support.dell.com/us/en/filelib/download/jump.asp?fileid=R31962&format=34958&location=2&sid=PLX_PNT_PII_GX1&lang=EN&lib=1&os=WNT5&searchtype=filter&devid=162&type=BIOS

-d
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Author Comment

by:Kuba
ID: 6478097
I haven't had a chance to try all the suggestions so far (at least I don't think I have), but here is what I have done/checked without success:

Ran SFC.  Found three potentially corrupt files including user.exe
Ran scanreg /fix.  Got a message that the registry was repaired.
Checked power settings in BIOS, they are disabled.
According to my documentation I am running the out current BIOS that will support faster processors and I should NOT update the BIOS any further.
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by:LeeTutor
ID: 6478148
What calling and called module names are listed in the error message for fatal exception 0E?
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6479542
You may be running the BIOS current to the system when it was shipped, but Dell updates their BIOSes all the time.  All subsequent updates include all fixes from the previous versions.

Another possibility is that there is a .DLL file conflict somewhere that is causing this problem. LeeTutor's question as to which modules are failing is a good start; it may help us determine if the problem is with one of the HA softwares causing conflicts.

Have you updated your DCOM98?  Visit http://www.microsoft.com/com/resources/downloads.asp and download DCOM for Windows 98.  Also, see the ACE homepage at http://my.ohio.voyager.net/~dhoehnen/software/ace.htm#Download%20Files and verify that you have all the proper files installed from there.

-d
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6479561
If ACE is a component of the HA system, why would you be closing it out anyway?  Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I have no experience with HA systems...

-d
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Author Comment

by:Kuba
ID: 6481223
I still need to check into a possible BIOS update.  As I have only had the machine a couple to weeks I don't think I'll find anything, but who knows.

There are no "modules" listed.  The blue screen says "A fatal exception 0E has occurred at: 0167:BFF9DFFF" and then just instructions on what I can do next (like ctrl-alt-del).  Now, lately the first thing that happens is a white dialog box pops up indicating an Explorer error, and I can choose to Close or Ignore.  *then* the blue screen error comes up.

All files for all programs (VB, Ace, DCOM, etc.) are brand new downloads from their respective web sites.

Since I use the system for HA I don't reboot all that often. However I have also had two mysterious lockup that I think could be related.  In each case the monitor was in slope mode so I could not tell what happened.  I have all power savings disabled right now, so if I lockup again at least I can see the screen.
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by:Kuba
ID: 6486401
OK,  BIOS.  I have reviewed all BIOS settings and they are correct.  The BIOS I am running is A07.  I was specifically told I could NOT use 08 or 09.  I am checking with Dell on the new A10 but am not optimistic that it will make a difference.

I can't find any IRQ conflicts.  In Device Manager properties both Com 4 and the sound card have a little "I" superimposed on them.  When I check resource details Windows is OK with everything.  I believe these are there because both are using IRQs that I specified rather than Windows.

All APM has been disabled for several days.

Should I consider reloading Windows?

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by:LeeTutor
ID: 6504385
The Device Manager exclamation points on Com 4 and the sound card mean there are troubles with those devices, an IRQ conflict or whatever.  You may have to remove them and re-install them.  If you have got device problems, I don't think it likely that re-loading windows will solve them.
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6505649
COM4?  Do you have a serial addon card in the system?  Try switching it to a different slot...And just to help eliminate an IRQ conflict problem, disable the sound system all together (double click it, check "Disable in this Hardware Profile").

-d
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6505660
Also, try downloading updated video drivers:
http://support.ati.com/drivers/win98/win98_4112560.html

ATI's driver software sometimes conflicts with various programs.

-d
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Author Comment

by:Kuba
ID: 6507300
Thanks for both suggestions, I'll try them as soon as I can.  To be clear the "I" in device manager properties is a "faded" blue I.  It appears to be more informational in nature (like alerting me to over-ridden settings).  It is NOT the bright yellow warning.  When it click on properties for a given device it tells me no conflicts exists.

Now here's why I have things configured and what I could/perhaps should change.  I started with two devices that needed physical com ports (1 and 2).  The modem needed a com port as well.  It is an old ISA 14.4 modem that only works with various com port/IRQ configurations (using jumpers).  This is the modem I need to be using.  Based upon all of this it was best to configure the modem for com 4/IRQ 5.  The sound card was using IRQ 5, but could use IRQ 7.  I set the sound card to use 7 (and got  my first "faded blue I."  I then added two "virtual" com ports (3 and 4) and changed com 4 to use IRQ 5 (hence my second "faded blue I").  I have since deleted com 3 as I didn't really need it.

Now.... I have since made some minor tweaks to my system and no longer need both physical com ports.  I could get rid of com 4 and reconfigure the modem for com 1 or 2 and put the sound card back on 5.  I guess assuming that disabling the sound card in the profile works this is what I should do.

I have had ALL power saving disabled for about a week but still get the blue screen when shutting down (at least 75% of the time).
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6510080
Well...I guess that one thing I'm not understanding is why you're shutting down at all, if this is a Home Automation system.  Do you use ACE for a specific activity (like using Word to create a document) or does it run continuously?  The blue "I's" are OK...I was interpreting what you were saying previously as yellow (!) .

I'm about out of ideas...

-d
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Author Comment

by:Kuba
ID: 6511222
dogztar,  I don't shut down very often but do have to shut down on occasion.   After all, I *am* using Windows :) Also if I want to update any software (like Ace or ECS) I must minimally shut those programs down.  I probably shut down every couple weeks so I could live with the problem.  But I am concerned about what else might be wrong. I don't need the system locking up while I am out of town (for example).  Ace establishes a DDE link with ECS.  It allows me, through a TCP/IP network to control the system via other PCs on the network.
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Author Comment

by:Kuba
ID: 6515296
I have not gotten to the video drivers yet.  I did disable the sound card in the profile.  No help.  I have NOT reconfigure the modem to another com port/IRQ as this looks like more monkeying with Windows settings.  The modem is particular about com port/IRQ combinations.  What I will probably do is disable the modem altogether and see what happens.
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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6519762
Well definitely try the video driver update...let us know how it goes...

-d
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by:Kuba
ID: 6521592
Just did the video driver update but the problem still exists.  Tried disabling the modem and that didn't help either.  The only semi-good news is that originally even if I left the program running and shut down Windows I would crash.  The last several times I have been able to shut down Windows successfully even with Ace running.  I have not had any more mysterious lockups in about three weeks, so in a worst case scenario I could live with the issue as I do have a way to shut down when I need to, and there does not seem to be any other implications.
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by:SysExpert
ID: 6521623
Well, you must have done something right.
I hope our suggestions were useful.

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by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6523581
So was it the modem being disabled or the video driver install?  Try re-enabling the modem to see...maybe ACE has some setting to fiddle with the COM ports (assuming some of the HA work is done via the serial ports).

-d
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Author Comment

by:Kuba
ID: 6525573
I don't think I was clear in my last comment so let me clarify.  There are four ways that I have tried to shut down Ace: Clicking (within Ace) "File" and then "Exit," clicking the "X" in the upper right corner of the Ace dialog, hitting ctrl-alt-del and selecting (for Ace) "end task" and just plain shutting down Windows.  All four methods ended up with the blue screen error 98% of the time.

Somewhere along the line (BEFORE the new video drivers or disabling the modem) I noticed that when I shut down Windows I was able to do so successfully.  I never mentioned this as I did not think it was significant.  I still crash 98% of the time using any of the other methods. Something must have changed somewhere along the line that one shut down method s now working, but I have no idea what that is.  I would still love to find a solution to the blue screen for the traditional close program methods, but my sense is that the idea well is running dry. If there are more thoughts I am ready to give them a try.  But if not, at least I can reboot Windows without crashing the system.  Something I could not do originally.

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by:Computer101
ID: 6695186
Hello all,
I am Computer101, a moderator from Experts-Exchange and also an expert within this topic area. This question has been open a long time.  What I am going to do is allow feedback from the questioner and experts.  If it is not resolved, I will delete or accept an answer based on the info I have been given, Experts, feel free to offer input.  I will monitor these questions for a period of 5-7 days and come back and evaluate.  I will have another moderator (who is also an expert in this topic area) look at the question also to ensure we do the right thing for this question.

Thank you
Computer101
Community Support Moderator
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by:Kuba
ID: 6699449
The problem still exists, although somewhere along the line it improved in some aspects. dogztar and LeeTutor had several comments.  Perhaps the fair thing is to split the points between the two of them?  I am very comfortable with whatever is decided.
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by:Computer101
ID: 6706463
points reduced to 100.  Comment from Leetutor accepted as answer.  dogztar, look for your question in this topic area.

Thank you
Computer101
Community Support moderator
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