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Power unit stops working when plugged in to mother board

Posted on 2001-09-13
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Last Modified: 2010-04-27
Hi

I am installing a new power unit in a desktop PC. The unit works fine (Fan turns!)when not plugged into motherboard. As soon as it is plugged in to motherboard it stops (Fan stops!).

What is the solution?

SM
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Question by:SophMarceau
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13 Comments
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Kyle Schroeder
ID: 6480214
Ensure that the Voltage switch is set appropriately for your country (either 115 or 220V).

You're not plugging it in while its on are you??  I doubt it, but you never know!

Are the POWERSW and PWR_LED leads from the case connected appropriately to the motherboard?

-d
0
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:magarity
ID: 6480218
First of all, you should not plug in a running power supply to a motherboard.  I assume this is an AT style power supply for an older motherboard?  Otherwise you would not normally be able to get it running without the switch logic on the motherboard.

"What is the solution?"

What possessed you to plug in a running power supply?
0
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:rid
ID: 6480331
See the above - try connecting to MB first, then connect mains power... If still no luck try PSU on another MB, if possible. Or the other way around, to see which one is at fault.
Regards
/RID
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:1175089
ID: 6480413
To start up ATX power supply, connected to the MB you must connect PWR ON switch to the MB.Without it you cant start the PC.
0
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:slink9
ID: 6480436
It sounds as if this person wants to fry the mobo and possibly get electrocuted.  Maybe the question was just worded incorrectly.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SophMarceau
ID: 6482691
Hi Everyone

Thanks for the tips. No I did not connect the power supply to the motherboard when the power switch was on!!! As Slink9 said I worded the question wrongly.

What I have noticed is that there are 2 connections to the motherboard. If I plug in both no response. If I just plug in 1 then there the fan turns and the disk lights come on. A soon as the 2 connections are plugged in and I SWITCH on the unit nothing happens.

I do not have another MB or PSU to try out.

Any more ideas please

Thanks

SM
0
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:slink9
ID: 6482706
Are you hooking the connectors "black on black"?  There are two black wires on each power connector.  Make sure these are both on the inside, hence the term "black on black."  The four black wires should be in the middle of the power connector.  If you have hooked them up backwards you may have fried the mobo and/or cpu.  Maybe not.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SophMarceau
ID: 6482712
To 1175089 how do I connect PWR switch to the motherboard. The Power On switch is part of the Power Supply unit. There is one of these old locks on the side of the PC. Ther is 2 wires coming out of the lock unto the mother board.

Thanks for your interest 1175089

SM
0
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:slink9
ID: 6482743
If you have two power cables, disregard that.  You don't have an ATX power supply.
0
 
LVL 31

Accepted Solution

by:
rid earned 400 total points
ID: 6482747
This seems to be an AT PSU. The power switch should not be connected to the MB. The lock you mention is probably the keyboard lock. There are pins on the MB that are used for this connector. It could be left unconnected. The power switch normally will be mounted somewhere on the inside of the front panel, behind a button or so.
Regards
/RID
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:1175089
ID: 6483372
What kind of power supply do you have ? (For Baby AT or ATX MB)? Some ATX power supplyes has a swith on it's back.
AT power supply connector (12 pin block)has two plugs, with six wires each.Two of them are black. ATX power supply connector (20 pin block) connects to the MBin only one waybecouse it has different hole sizes.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SophMarceau
ID: 6483808
Thanks everyone. I am sure now from what you all say that I have an AT PSU. I will check for another switch on the front of the PC. The panel was removed when I got it so there were no buttons to be seen. I will check the PC on Tuesday when I return to work and let you all know how I get on.

Thanks again all

SM
0
 

Author Comment

by:SophMarceau
ID: 6494887
Thanks all. Success!
0

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