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Meaning of " in SCO?

tel2
tel2 asked
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I've recently done some work on a SCO (I think) UNIX system, and have a few questions:

1. When I do an ls, some filenames have an "*" appear at the end.  Eg:
# ls
.netrc                 send_file*
What does this indicate?

2. When I do a finger, similarly, the "*" appears at the start of the Tty column:
# finger
Login    Name                  Tty  Idle  Login Time       Where
user1    Username1            *p8         Thu Sep 20 08:28 sdncc200
user2    Username2            *p2         Thu Sep 20 13:36 sdncc202
What does this indicate?

3. How can I confirm that I'm using SCO?

4. How can I confirm what version of SCO I'm using?

Thanks.
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Commented:
Use the comand:
      uname -a

      or :
      cat /etc/issue

to find out.
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Author

Commented:
Thanks yuzh,

In the case of this machine, the:
# uname -a
Command give this output:
SCO_SV ctol33 3.2 2 i386

So that answers my questions 3 & 4 (my secondary issue).  The other command didn't help in this case, because the file which /etc/issue points to, is empty.

# ls -l /etc/issue                            
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root     root          37 Jun 15  1998 /etc/issue -> /var/opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.4Eb/etc/issue*

# ls -l /var/opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.4Eb/etc/issue*
-rwxr--r--   1 root     sys            0 Jun 15  1998 /var/opt/K/SCO/Unix/5.0.4Eb/etc/issue*

Thanks, and I look forward to hearing from someone who can answer my questions 1 & 2.
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Commented:
1. the "*" indicates that the file is executable (x-bits set)
   this is caused by ls' -F option, so I assume that you either have ls aliased (check with: alias ls), or you ls reads a environment variable which is set with "-F", (check with: man ls)
2. the "*" for finger means, that this terminal has no write permission, this st tells you that you cannot use write and/or talk to communicate with the user on this tty
(see man finger, write)
3. uname -s
4. uname -r
3. + 4. uname -a
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Author

Commented:
EXCELLENT answer, ahoffman!

And you were right; there was an alias for "ls", which contained the "-F" switch.

Thanks, and keep up the good work!

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