Int eh windows registry what is the key's class

Several of the registry functions deal with a class string varaible associated with registry keys.  If can't find anything on the signficance of this value.  Nor can I seem to find a case where it is not a NULL string.  What is it?  How is it used?
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nietodAsked:
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MadshiCommented:
Good question. I always wondered about that, too. Win9x doesn't even support this class registry parameter (AFAIK)...

Regards, Madshi.
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nietodAuthor Commented:
Not really what I wanted to hear.  :-_
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peterchen092700Commented:
Same answer again - I did (some time ago) an extensive MSDN search about this, it's only mentioned in the Registry API documentaiton, without explanation. To me it looks like a feature that made it into the API but nowhere else.
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peterchen092700Commented:
perhaps crawl your registry and see if there's any key that has an non-empty class string....
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nietodAuthor Commented:
I don't see where the class string appears in the registry editor.  None fo the key's i've quired programtically have a non-empty class string.
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gambisticsCommented:
Seems to mean nothing right now:

MSDN

RegCreateKeyEx:
[...]
lpClass
[in] Pointer to a null-terminated string that specifies the class (object type) of this key. This parameter is ignored if the key already exists. No classes are currently defined; applications should pass a null string. Windows 95 and Windows 98 use this parameter only for remote registry keys; it is ignored for local registry keys. Windows NT/Windows 2000 supports this parameter for both local and remote registry keys.
[...]

RegEnumKeyEx
[...]
lpClass
[in/out] Pointer to a buffer that receives the null-terminated class string of the enumerated subkey. No classes are currently defined; applications should ignore this parameter. This parameter can be NULL.
[...]

I think it's intented for giving keys sort of type information in future. The real answer knows probably only the inventor of this....
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nietodAuthor Commented:
I'd like to know more.  but thanks.
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