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Noisy CPU cooling propellor... What should I do?


I've got a three year old PentiumII-350Mhz computer.
Lately its getting noisy. From time to time I hear buzzing from inside the case. Sometimes it stops then it starts back again.
I opened up the case and tried to locate the origin of the noise.
It seems like its coming from the CPU cooling propeller. When I touched the propeller for like less than a second it stopped making noise. But after a minute er even less it started to making noise again.
A fiend of mine told me to oil it.
Is this true?
Does anyone have experience with this process?
Any tips?
In a word: HELP! :)


1 Solution
The little bearings a re sealed so unless it is touching something I doubt if it will stop BUT if you want to try use a little silcon and see if it helps I really would suggest you buy a new one they are not that expensive
These can sometimes be TEMPORARILY fixed with some oil but the problem will quickly come back.  Don't waste too much time fooling with it because replacement fans are very inexpensive.  Just get a new Pentium II CPU fan and replaced it.

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Kyle SchroederEndpoint EngineerCommented:
You might be able to fix it even easier with a can of compressed air...turn the system off, then blast the fan's blades with a good long shot of compressed air.

If you want to try oiling it, you may be able to get to where you need to put the oil by carefully removing the sticker over the center of the fan and putting a drop or 2 of lightweight oil (I have seen sewing machine oil suggested).

But as suggested above by jhance and sorgie, just get a new one.  If you don't want the expense of paying shipping from an online order, check your local PC shop, they'll probably have a bunch of old P-II coolers they'll part with for cheap.

If the fan lasted 3 years, then you got a pretty good run out of it and probably a new fan is in order. You can oil it, but by now it will probably be a rather short term solution.

Where I live, environmental conditions are such that a new fan will last maybe 4 months max before it squeals to a halt, (bearings go rusty!) therefore I oil all mine, since I don't want to be spending a few hundred a year on new fans. I use "3in1" oil on mine, I have tried motor oil and light grease as well, both of which tend to get gummy after a month or so and inhibit startup.

Best way to determine whether you can get along much longer by putting a drop of oil in every few months or so is to put your fingers on top and try wobbling it, if there is excessive play, the bearings are badly worn and you won't get much more life out of it. If it doesn't wobble much, and seems stiff it might have gotten a little gummy and/or rust filmed, in which case a dose of 3 in 1 will keep it going. Usually if the noise is on/off/on/off, it's vibration due to bearing wear, whereas if it's noisy at startup but settles down when running, it's gummy oil residue or a little rust or dust-gunk in the bearings and fresh oil will benefit it. Worn ones respond better to thicker oil, but you have to keep doing it quite often, so it's usually not worth the trouble. Don't use WD-40, it will work for a week maybe before it all evaporates, it's too light, also it will tend to work more as a cutting agent in worn fans and speed thier demise.

Meant to post the other day, must have got distracted.


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