How to bypass manual fsck at startup?


Dear Experts,

When electiricty goes off on my linux box, it usually needs manual intervention to run fsck at startup once electricity is back up.

If there is a way, how can I make it boot normally everytime without running fsck manually and requiring the root password to do so?  My problem is that I am not always available when such a thing happens and I would like to linux to start back up as normally as possible in case of electricity outage and restoration so that it provides the necessary routing and Internet connectivity it is supposed to serve.

Many thanks in advance for your help and experience.
u1Asked:
Who is Participating?
 
tdaoudConnect With a Mentor Commented:

If you'd like to upgrade to redhat 7.2 I suggest that you format a new hard disk with ext3 from scratch, it maybe a good way to upgrade and start using ext3.

Otherwise you can upgrade to redhat 7.2 then you need to create the journal file on each partition/filesystem using the command tune2fs (this can be done on mounted or unmounted filesystems).  Example of the command

tune2fs -j /dec/hdxx

Then you simply need to change the filesystem type in the /etc/fstab file from ext2 to ext3.

The good thing about ext3 is its compatiblity with ext2 and the ability to switch between both types at any time. Even old kernels see ext3 filesystems as ext2 and access it as normal as a simple ext2 filesystem.

Hope this helps

Tarik
0
 
tdaoudCommented:

One thing you can try is to

touch /etc/fastboot

Having that file there will make it bypass fsck checking at startup.

Tarik
0
 
ahoffmannCommented:
if the system goes down unexpected/unattened, the filesystem is corrupted, or as fsck says: dirty.

You need to run fsck, otherwise you will loose data, probably not what you want.

To prewent data loss, I can think of following solutions:
  1. use a journaling filesystem, like ext3, reiserfs, xfs, etc.
  2. run a cron which periodicala (every minute) syncs the disks using the sync command
     (but this will not always prewent fsck)

0
Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

 
u1Author Commented:

ahoffmann,

ofcourse I don't like to loose data, but soemtimes not interrupting the service is very important.  My linux box is mainly for routing and web server.

I have redhat 7.1 and will be upgrading to redhat 7.2 soon when I get the time.

I have been reading about the new journaling filesystem like ext3.

My question is can you convert an existing ext2 partition to ext3 or you would need to create new ones and copy data from one to another and so forth?
0
 
ahoffmannCommented:
tdaoud said it all about ext3 :)
0
 
newmangCommented:
Slightly off-topic but have you considered a small UPS equipped with software to gracefully shut down your system in the event of a power failure?
0
 
u1Author Commented:

Actually I do have an old UPS that has no serial/software conection to linux.  I was already thinking toward that direction too.  But sometimes (it happened twice) we get electricity problems that even put the UPS out instantly.

I will be using tdaoud's /etc/fastboot suggestion until I upgrade to redhat 7.2 and use ext3.

Thanks for all your suggestions.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.