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Routing using computer with Windows 98 installed

What I am trying to do is to set up a Win 98 computer so that I will act as a router between to different networks. This is so that network B can get access to the Internet through the ISDN router on network A along with printer sharing.

Network A
IP addresses on all computers are manually added and are static. There is an ISDN router on this network to give Internet access.
The IP addresses for the network cards are in the range 192.168.20.10 to 192.168.20.50
The IP address for the ISDN router is 192.168.20.1
Subnet mask is set to 255.255.255.0
Under the IP properties on each of the computers, under gateway I have added the ISDN router IP address also the DNS is enabled with the IP addresses of my ISP DNS servers entered.

This all works OK and the computers can get access to the Internet.


Network B
Again the IP addresses on all computers are manually added and are static. There is no routers or Internet access on this network.
The IP addresses for the network cards are in the range 192.168.54.20 to 192.168.54.30
Subnet mask is set to 255.255.255.0


Both networks are on the same cabling.


I have set up computer running Win 98 with 2 network cards installed. One with the IP address 192.168.20.51 and the other 192.168.54.10
Gateway on the 192.168.20.51 network card is set to 192.168.20.1
No gateway set on the 192.168.54.10 network card
Subnet on both cards is 255.255.255.0


From a computer on network B (IP address 192.168.54.30 gateway set to 192.168.54.10) I can ping both 192.168.20.51 and 192.168.54.10 but if I try and ping any other address on network A, I get a time out.
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meto
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meto
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1 Solution
 
scraig84Commented:
Windows 98 is not an OS that can route.  With NT, there are checkboxes to do "ip forwarding" which allows routing, and 2000 has the Routing and Remote Access services which allows you to set up routing with a bit more detail.  Windows 98 is a true client OS and does not have the option to route.  Like all OS's it keeps an internal routing table, but this is for its own use when there are multiple cards etc installed - not for allowing packets to pass through it from other devices.  There may be some shareware or freeware utilities that will allow 98 to route, but it is not inherant of the operating system.
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mikecrCommented:
If you go under Tools on the Windows 98 CD you will see a folder called RIP. If you double click on the iprip.exe and install it, it will allow you to route on your 98 machine between subnets.
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scraig84Commented:
That is not true.  This only caused 98 to listen to RIP routes and be able to select paths based on them.  It still does not cause a 98 machine to route packets that are sent to it.  Take a look at this:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q194464
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mikecrCommented:
True, but it does work if your running RIP on another box.
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UkWizardCommented:
Here are a few options;


1. Install proxy server software on the 98 dual nicced machine. this can act as a web-proxy for the 2nd subnet.

2. See if you can put a second IP address on the ISDN router. One in each subnet.

3. Install a different OS on the dual nicced machine, thats supports ip forwarding ( routing ).
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UkWizardCommented:
Here are a few options;


1. Install proxy server software on the 98 dual nicced machine. this can act as a web-proxy for the 2nd subnet.

2. See if you can put a second IP address on the ISDN router. One in each subnet.

3. Install a different OS on the dual nicced machine, thats supports ip forwarding ( routing ).
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stevenlewisCommented:
also check into a hardware router solution
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stevenlewisCommented:
a box with linux may be your best and cheapest solution
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ridCommented:
Re: the above.
freesco may do the trick. Depending on traffic volume, a 486 even might be enough. Look at www.freesco.org
Regards
/RID
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