Mimicking preprocessor

New to Java.  I am told that Java does not have the concept of a preprocessor like other languages such as C/C++.  How do you perform conditional compilations in Java?  What I want to be able to do is have certain code executable in release or system test code but not in unit test code.

c095276Asked:
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imladrisConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You're right, there is no preprocessor in Java. In fact, there isn't one that is standard with any language, except C/C++.

The Java solution to conditional compilation is to use constants. The constant can be set, before compilation, to control what happens. For instance:

public static final boolean DEBUG  =false;

if(DEBUG)
{   System.out.println("Stuff");
}



This will wind up being conditional compilation (rather than just an if statement) because any Java compiler will omit compiling this code fragment if DEBUG is false, since it is easy to see that it will never be executed. To "turn it on" you change the value of DEBUG to true before your next compile.
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Venci75Commented:
java 1.4 is the first try to differentiate the release and debug code. In all other releases you have same code for release and debug purposes. If you want to add some code, that must not be executed in the release, you can do this by using a real variables. For example:
class MyClass {
public static final boolean DEBUG = true;
...
public static void main(String[] arg) {
...
if (DEBUG) {
  // do something
}
...
}
}

because the DEBUG is public and static - it is global and you can access it from all classes using this code:
MiClass.DEBUG
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imladrisCommented:
Did that information help?

If so then it is now time to grade the answer. If not, perhaps a clarifying question would be useful.
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