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unsetenv under SUN Solaris

C compiler under SUN solaris reports it can't find unsetenv function.

does anybody know how to unset an environment variable from inside a C program under SUN Solaris?
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mliberi
Asked:
mliberi
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1 Solution
 
jkrCommented:
There is none - see e.g. http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=de&selm=5rtbgc%24556%40tooting.netapp.com

However, you could always create your own, e.g.

#include <stdlib.h>
void unsetenv(char *env_name) {
  extern char **environ;
  char **cc;
  int l;
  l=strlen(env_name);
  for (cc=environ;*cc!=NULL;cc++) {
    if (strncmp(env_name,*cc,l)==0 && ((*cc)[l]=='='||(*cc)[l]=='\0')) break;
  } for (; *cc != NULL; cc++) *cc=cc[1];
}
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mliberiAuthor Commented:
jkr,

thank you for the chunk of C code you submitted.
It is actually very similar to the solution I self built and tested a few days ago: the main difference is that I applied free() system call to the line just unsetted thus causing a coredump.

man page of putenv() states that new environment variables are going to be allocated using malloc(), so why the free() fails?

I know it is not a great damage to leave it allocated even if unused, but I would like to know why it can't be allocated. Under AIX free() works without causing a coredump.

In a few days I'm going to test your code: if it works as expected I'll grade your reply.
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jkrCommented:
>>man page of putenv() states that new environment
>>variables are going to be allocated using malloc(),
>>so why the free() fails?

Well, 'getenv()' might not return the buffer that was 'malloc()'ed, but a different one...
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ecwCommented:
"putenv states that new environment variables are going to be allocated using malloc()",  it doesn't say anything about old environment variables, ie. ones inherited from the execing process.  Typically these are part of the initial stack frame.
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jkrCommented:
ecw is right - and, if the PEB is

"var1=test1\0var2=test2\0var3=test3\0"

and you get a pointer to "var2=test2", 'free()' wouldn't really make sense anyway...
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jkrCommented:
mliberi - anything new?
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mliberiAuthor Commented:
thank you all for your comments
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