about compile option -D

Hello,

When using "cc" to compile a C program, -DXXXX can be specified as a compile option. Here, "XXXX" may be a macro defined by myself, or a macro defined by Solaris, such like "_LP64". Is there any way to know what macros Solaris provides? And how about such of HP-UX?
Thanks.

sincerely,
fancyqin
fancyqinAsked:
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akohliCommented:
I think Yes..But in order to test. DO small test on Your platfrom.Like


main()
{

#ifdef _sun
printf("SUN is already defined \n");

}

Compile it without any complier flag and check..
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ahoffmannCommented:
use cc -v  to display what the compiler sets by default

When you say "to know what macros Solaris provides?", I assume you want to know which macros are possible.
Short answer: there is no way.
Long answer: this is the wrong question, somehow.
Solaris does not "provide macros". The macros are used and defined in the source files. macros can be (nearly) any string.
To find out which are used by the OS (Solaris, HP-UX, etc.), do something like:
     find /usr/include -type f -name \*.h -exec grep define {} \;|sort -u
be prepared for a huge output.
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jlevieCommented:
Well that depends on what you are trying to find out and what compiler is being used. There are a set of system & compiler predefinitions for all operating systems. On a Solaris system with a Workshop or Forte C compiler those predefinitions are shown in 'man cc'. If Gnu C is installed you'd get it's predefinitions by:

> touch foo.h
> cpp -dM foo.h

So far as I know the trick with cpp will work on any OS that includes cpp.
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akohliCommented:
U can u man cc inorder to find the predefined MACROS available for the compiler in that particular platform
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fancyqinAuthor Commented:
Hello,

Execute "man -M /opt/SUNWspro/man cc", got:
......
-Dname[=token]
   Associates name with the specified token  as  if  by  a
   #define  preprocessing  directive.   If  no  =token  is
   specified, the token 1 is supplied.
   Predefinitions:unix
               sparc (SPARC)
               i386 (Intel)
               sun

   The above are not predefined in -Xc mode.
   These predefinitions are valid in all modes:
            __sun
            __unix
            __SUNPRO_C=0x420
            __`uname -s`_`uname -r`
            __sparc (SPARC)
            __i386 (Intel)
            __BUILTIN_VA_ARG_INCR
            __SVR4
            __LITTLE ENDIAN (PowerPC)
            __ppc (PowerPC)
   The following is predefined in -Xa and -Xt modes only:
            __RESTRICT
   The compiler also predefines the object-like macro
            __PRAGMA_REDEFINE_EXTNAME,
   to indicate the pragma will be recognized.
......

Those above are all predefined MACROS?
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jlevieCommented:
Yes, those are all of the publically defined values for Sun's compiler. There are, I believe, others that exist but they aren't intended for use by programs and may change from one compiler release to another. In general system pre-defined values will be prefixed with '__'. So if you are wanting to avoid a clash with a system definition don't use '__' as a prefix for a local definition.
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tfewsterCommented:
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this Topic Area.
I will leave a recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area as follows:

- Answered by akohli

Please leave any comments here within the next 7 days

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER !

tfewster (I don't work here, I'm just an Expert :-)
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moduloCommented:
Finalized as proposed

modulo

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