Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 180
  • Last Modified:

Scheduled defrag of Ntfs Mapped Drives

I'd like to schedule routine defragging of my mapped NTFS drives.  Now I do it manually in Computer Management while reading the paper :-(

By mapped drives, I mean separate partitions that I've mapped into C:, such as
C:\MyData
C:\Reference
C:\DevTools
which facilitates backup and DrvImage snapshots.  I like to separate MyData to back it up separately, and not backup or snapshot the tools that don't change.

Anyway, I end up with a fair number of partitions.  I've seen the article

http://www.winntmag.com/Articles/Index.cfm?ArticleID=8276 

which Housenet answered an earlier question on:
Scheduling Defrag/Scandisk in Win 2000

but I'm not clear if the same technique will apply to my mapped partition drives.  Some of them have embedded spaces in them (wonder why MS did that for "Program Files")

TIA
0
ee-user
Asked:
ee-user
  • 2
1 Solution
 
HousenetCommented:
-Hi,
-You have when you created a partition you assigned it a folder location instead of a drive ltter, like C:\DevTools, right ?
-If this is the case then it seems to me that a defrag of C:\ would defragment c:\DevTools as well, even though it actially exists on a seperate partition.
0
 
AvonWyssCommented:
Housenet, I think you're wrong. The defragmenting process works on devices, not on logical drives and files. Therefore, it will not defrag anything but the actual root device assigned to the drive letter if you do a defrag. Confirmation of this can be seen on the defrag screen itself, where you don't see any change in drive size/free space values if you add or remove drives via mount point.

You have to defrag all of them. By sending some cursor down commands in the script, you can have the script choose the right partition. Note that you cannot have two defrags running in parallel, you have to serialize them. Note that maybe a commercial defragger, which not only natively supports sheduling but also more efficient defrag methods (like, sorting files by access time so that frequently used files have faster access etc.) may be a good idea.
0
 
AvonWyssCommented:
Thanks for grading my answer!
0

Featured Post

Upgrade your Question Security!

Your question, your audience. Choose who sees your identity—and your question—with question security.

  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now