Urgent help for some CCNA question in my first failed attempted of my CCNA

1. If you can ping to ip, gateway address but not remote network, what could be the problem?

a)Incorrect Configuration of TCP/IP,
b)Local network address problem,
c)remote network address problem
d)gateway address problem.

2. Do half duplex has a shared collision domain and low throughput?

3. What is the range of host addresses if, for example, ip address is with subnet mask, ...........112, ............119, ..................126,
....................175, ...................208

4. If you see both ethernet 0 and protocol are down, which of the osi layer
protocols could it be the problem?

5. If you increase the window from 3000 to 4000 of the TCP, what can the  sending host do?
Send up to 4000 packets, frames, byes or segments to the receiving host?

6. Can a port in Vlan 1 ping to Vlan 2?

Thanks in advance
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mikecrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Let's use your IP as an example.  If you dissect it using a subnet mask of, you get 14 subnets with 14 hosts per subnet which would be thru 15. The first IP of 0 would be the network ID and the last IP 15 would be the broad cast ID. This leaves you 1 thru 14 for your hosts. Now lets say you have thru 31. 16 would be your network ID and 31 would be your broadcast ID which would give you thru 30 as your host ID's. When subnetting, just remember that the first IP in the subnet will always be the network ID and the last IP in the subnet will always be the broadcast ID so in essance if you subnet with a subnet mask of, your network ID will be and your broadcast ID will be if you do the math correctly. You range of IP addresses would be thru Do you understand now?
1. It could be B,C,or D.
B, no routing past gateway to get to remote network.
C, remote address could be on a wrong subnet, which that could include A
D, an incorrect gateway could be specified to get to the remote network.

2. ???  Half duplex has nothing to do with a collision domain however your thruput would be lower at half duplex rather than full duplex. Please be more specific.

3. You can have 14 subnets with 14 hosts per subnet ranging from to and so on.

4. If both of them are down, it's layer 1, probably a cabling problem.

5. Bytes. TCP windows are dictated in bytes.

6. Trick question! Sure, as long as your routing between them but by default, no.
da511Author Commented:
For question 1, I can only choose one of them.
For question 3, what is the range
a. 33-112
b. 112-119
b. 119-126
c. 126-175
d. 175-208

my guess is (a). Am I correct?

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If I had to choose one answer for question 1, it would be C.

119-126 would be the valid answer. Remember, your only allowed 14 hosts so if you subtract 33 from 112 you get more than 14 hosts so it's immediately wrong. 112-119 is incorrect because 112 is a network address and not a host address, 126-175 is incorrect because all the addresses are not on the same segment, and finally for the last one, 175 is a broadcast address and 208 is a network ID also which would make it an invalid range.

da511Author Commented:
Can you tell me how you determine which is a network, host or broadcast?
1. The correct answer is c)
b) is not correct because you can ping from local host to gateway
d) same reason
a) same reason
c) correct, because if say you have private address on the remote network you are not able to ping it

2. YES by definition
3. mikekr gave an excellent explanation
4. & 5. again agree with mikekr
6. NO, but http://www.sans.org/newlook/resources/IDFAQ/vlan.htm
da511Author Commented:
Your explaination is excellent
If you need help with anything else da511, please stop back.
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