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cannot telnet to new machine on network.

Posted on 2002-03-18
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
There is a new machine on our network and when I try to telnet into it, I get a message saying "Not on console."  It won't let me telnet into it, so my question is:

What setting do I look for on a server that will not allow telnet from remote machines.

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Question by:carydb
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by:ecw
ID: 6877798
Try to login as something other than root.  By default root can only login on the console.  From /etc/default/login,

# If CONSOLE is set, root can only login on that device.
# Comment this line out to allow remote login by root.
#
CONSOLE=/dev/console

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by:carydb
ID: 6877832
Yes, I can login with my user ID, but I would like to log in as root.  The /etc/default/login Does not have CONSOLE set, so It seems like I should be able to telnet into the box.  The following is from the machine's /etc/default/login:

# If CONSOLE is set, root can only login on that device.
# Comment this line out to allow remote login by root.
#
#CONSOLE=/dev/console


This new machine is replacing a machine that has been in the network for a while.  That older machine will allow telnets from root.
I would like to tkeep the new machine configured as closely as possible to the old one.

Any other ideas?

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by:ecw
ID: 6878455
This is the sual cause, have you checked the entire file to make sure there isn't any line beginning with
  CONSOLE=
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yuzh earned 50 total points
ID: 6878702
Telnet is not secure, you should not use telnet to login as root to the system.

Get a copy of secure shell installed on you system, and use secure shell instead.

   you can download it from the following site:

   http://sunfreeware.com/

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by:newmang
ID: 6881208
You really should not allow root to telnet in directly, you should consider a secure shell as yush suggests.

In the meantime you can telnet in as your user then type su - and provide root's password to become root.

Note the - after the su means you become root with root's environment, if you leave the - off then you become root but with your own environment.

Cheers - Gavin
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