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IrDA and Out-of-band

Posted on 2002-03-27
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When I read the technical book. I saw this sentence


"NDIS 4.0 added the following new features to NDIS 3.1
1. Fast IrDA Media Extension.
2. Out-of-band data support (required for Broadcast PC)"


What is "IrDA" and Out-of-band??

Many Thanks in advances.
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Question by:rotaris357
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Expert Comment

by:Gareth Gudger
ID: 6904325
IrDA is the added support for Infrared point-to-point communications.

I believe Out-of-band is for Radio point-to-point communications.
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Expert Comment

by:havman56
ID: 7013242
rotaris,

windows 2000 has IRDA capablity . so NDIS may also ahve it..

i am working on it every easy to communicate the data from windows PC to other device throgh wireless (IRDA).

special feature in 2000 not in NT .
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Accepted Solution

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Rapier42 earned 45 total points
ID: 7017987
I'm not sure what "out-of-band data support" is, networking isn't my field.  I have no idea what NDIS or IrDA are, sorry.  :)

I can tell you that in-band and out-of-band are two different ways of communicating link control in a network.  In-band means that link control is accomplished using the same path you use for traffic...  think of the way a phone call works.  When you pick up the receiver and dial, those digits(link control) are carried to the telco switch on the same path that will carry your voice(traffic).  In an out-of-band signalling situation, the information telling the telco switch where to route your phone call would be carried on a different "path" than the actual call itself.  Sometimes that path is nothing more than a virtual timeslot in a bit stream, sometimes it is literally a different physical facility.

So, "out-of-band data support", when applied to a broadcast network, means that link management and traffic control(layer 2 and up in the OSI model) are a different signal than the traffic itself, possibly carried on a distinct radio or IR frequency.

Hope this helps!
Kevin
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Expert Comment

by:havman56
ID: 7046569
rotaris
 sleeping heavily!!!!
post ur comments
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Author Comment

by:rotaris357
ID: 7066087
Thanks for in-bound and out-of-band knowledge even I also want to know IRDA and and how is it supported ?

Thanks so much.
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