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Getting the right files for a build

Posted on 2002-04-01
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Last Modified: 2010-05-02
I have an application developed on a Win95 machine and deployed to a variety of Win95, Win98 and NT machines. Our group is moving to an XP OS and moved my code to the XP machine. Now when I do a build, the PDW takes files from Windows/System for Oleaut32, olepro32 and others but these files are not backward compatible to the older OS we are deployed to.
A couple of questions:
1.) How can I change my build (using PDW) to take the correct dlls. I know I can store them in a separate directory but I can't point to that directory using PDW. Is there a file I can modify (obviously this information is stored somewhere) to point to the 'build' directory for PDW?

2.)  Back in the days of VB3 we used to install all of the dlls into a directory that we controlled, a subdirectory  under the application. We would not install the dll's into the system directory. Is this a possibility to help avoid problems with versions etc?

Thanks,
Bob O'M>
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Question by:rwomalley
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by:Anthony Perkins
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I believe PDW pulls the DLL from:

\Microsoft Visual Studio\VB98\Wizards\PDWizard\Redist

And not the System folder.

Anthony
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by:Anthony Perkins
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Actually that should have read:
PDW will use components in the folder:

\Microsoft Visual Studio\VB98\Wizards\PDWizard\Redist

BEFORE the ones in the System or System32 folders.

Anthony
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by:Gunsen
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I believe you have to make a deploy script for each OS
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by:rwomalley
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But isnt there a file in the vb source directory that PDW reads from to know where to get the dlls? And if so, can it be modified?
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by:Anthony Perkins
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Components will be pulled from the Redist before the System or System32 folder, however you should be able to modify options in the .PDM files.

Anthony
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Anthony Perkins earned 100 total points
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Here is something from MSDN that may help:

<quote>
Since a project can be distributed several different ways, several deployment packages can be created for a project, and all of the package/deployment scripts are stored in the same .pdm file. New scripts are added to the beginning of the projects .pdm file.
</quote>

Anthony
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Author Comment

by:rwomalley
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can i edit the pdm file directly to point to where i want to take the dlls?
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by:Anthony Perkins
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I have never had the need to do it, however take a look at the following from MSDN:

<quote>
You can manually modify the script (.pdm) file in a text editor, such as NotePad. The .pdm file contains all the scripts for a single project, and it is a recording of all the options you selected when packaging or deploying an application using the PDW.

To modify the path to a folder in a script, open the project's .pdm file in a text editor, and modify the path in all references to the file. After saving the changes to the file, rerun the PDW.

NOTE:

This method does not work for updating the path to the project's .exe file. The PDW picks up the path from the Path32 setting of the .vbp file instead.


Make a backup copy of the .pdm file before modifying.

</quote>

Anthony
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Author Comment

by:rwomalley
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Thanks, I think you have answered my question.
Bob O'M>
p.s. I wasn't able to award you the points. Did you enter your answer as a comment?
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Author Comment

by:rwomalley
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Thanks alot!
Bob O'M>
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