return a string from a dll function

I have a visual c++ (version 6) DLL that takes a parameter username, determines the date and time,  stores this datetime value in a database.

I must now return this datetime(String) back to the calling program and I am not sure how to do it.

The dll function is defined as:

__declspec(dllexport) int _cdecl StoreToken(char *strContextName) {
   time_t        ltime;
   struct        tm *gmTime;
   char         *currentUTC;

   time( &ltime );
   gmTime = gmtime( &ltime );                  
   currentUTC = strdup(asctime(gmTime));
   //Code to store currentUTC in database has been omited
   //currentUTC is what I would like to return to the
   //calling program
...
return bstored;  // I am using this to determine is the
                 // function worked.
}

The test program I am using is as follows:

// TestDll.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"

extern int StoreToken(char *contextName);

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char thedate[] = "";
    char contextname[] = ".cn=sdbanks.ou=itd.ou=chho.o=apm";
     StoreToken(contextname);
     return (0);
}


What changes must I do to return currentUTC to the calling program.
LVL 1
sdbanksAsked:
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jkrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
To elaborate - the basic idea is to pass a buffer to a location where you want to receive the string, along with the size of that buffer. The funcion in the DLL checks whether the buffer is of sufficiant size and copys the date string into that buffer...
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jkrCommented:
Make it read

__declspec(dllexport) int _cdecl StoreToken(char *strContextName, char* pszUTCBuf, long lnBufSize) {
  time_t        ltime;
  struct        tm *gmTime;
  char         *currentUTC;

  time( &ltime );
  gmTime = gmtime( &ltime );                  
  currentUTC = strdup(asctime(gmTime));

  if ( strlen ( currentUTC) < lnBufSize) {

     strcpy ( pszUTCBuf, currentUTC);

  } else {

   // buffer not big enough, error!
  }

return bstored;  // I am using this to determine is the
                // function worked.
}

#define MAX_THEDATE 256
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   char thedate[ MAX_THEDATE] = "";
   char contextname[] = ".cn=sdbanks.ou=itd.ou=chho.o=apm";
    StoreToken(contextname, thedate, MAX_THEDATE);
    return (0);
}

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sdbanksAuthor Commented:
Thank you very much.  It worked great.  I was looking all day for information on how to do this.
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jkrCommented:
You're welcome - that's the way that e.g. your app receives textual information from Windows (see e.g. 'GetWindowsDirectory()'). Just one correction that I'd recommend:

__declspec(dllexport) int _cdecl StoreToken(char *strContextName, char* pszUTCBuf, long lnBufSize) {
 time_t        ltime;
 struct        tm *gmTime;
 char         *currentUTC;

 time( &ltime );
 gmTime = gmtime( &ltime );                  
 currentUTC = strdup(asctime(gmTime));

 if ( strlen ( currentUTC) < lnBufSize) {

    strcpy ( pszUTCBuf, currentUTC);

 } else {

  // buffer not big enough, error!
 }

 free ( currentUTC); // <----!!! will cause memory leaks otherwise!

return bstored;  // I am using this to determine is the
               // function worked.
}
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sdbanksAuthor Commented:
I will do that right away.  Is that something I should do for every variable when I exit the routine or just for char *currentUTC?

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jkrCommented:
Well, in this case, just that variable. It is because "strdup()" uses a "malloc()" to return the duplicated string, and the docs also say that you have to "free()" it manually...
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