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Want to share files over a network between linux and windows xp?

Posted on 2002-04-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
How can I access my windows shared folders accross my network, on my linux box?

How can I Access my linux box on my windows machine?

Help!!!
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Question by:chrishughes
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Expert Comment

by:MFCRich
ID: 6920716
Samba (www.samba.org)--- this comes with most distros these days. Configuration can be a PITA but once its running it is very reliable.
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by:LeeMiller
ID: 6921698
if it is installed try this as root

smbmount //windowsserver/shsre /mountpointonlinux -o username=user

it will prompt you for a password (this is all assuming its installed and you werent aware of samba)
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Author Comment

by:chrishughes
ID: 6921846
Right! I have worked out how to do that (I must have had Samba installed), and I can mount a shared folder.

a) Can I add the smbmount statement to a file so that it mounts whenbever the machine is started?

b) How can I see the linux machine from my windows network neigbourhood..??

Thanx
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Expert Comment

by:MFCRich
ID: 6925251
a) The place to do this is '/etc/init.d/rc.local' on a RedHat machine. This file is executed as the last part of booting up.

b) Configure and run Samba at startup. On my Redhat machine Samba is called the 'smb' service.
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Expert Comment

by:LeeMiller
ID: 6925264
from a browser window open localhost:901.
This is a web based SAMBA configuration app.
From there you can set shares on your linux machine that can be seen and accessed from NT.

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by:maZZoo
ID: 6926570
MFCRich 's comment is maybe feasible, but usually you add the mount to /etc/fstab:
//windowsserver/shsre /mountpointonlinux smbfs user,noauto

this will ask a authorized user for a password when mounting, but you can also directly hack the password into /etc/fstab with
username=itsme,password=sEEcret

to see your linux share from windows is a different story, go through /etc/smb.conf, its usually nicely documented.

m
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Accepted Solution

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SteveWaite earned 100 total points
ID: 7622201
if you still haven't got your shared directory showing this should get something going:

edit /etc/samba/smb.conf and set:
  security = share

and add something like:

# A publicly accessible directory
[shared]
  comment = shared stuff
  path = /tmp/shared
  read only = no
  public = yes

and you have a directory /tmp/shared with files set to rw

also:
 /etc/inittab called by init is like autoexec.bat when the system starts

regards
steve
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