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Going back to the Beginning - Flatting the Hard Drive -well maybe not all the way

Posted on 2002-04-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
Hi,
I thought i knew the ins and outs of WIndows 2000 - not everything but an average amount. I thought that a clean install from the MS w2000 disk would get rid of everything, but obviously that is not the case. At first I thought it was my memory failing me, every so often I clean install my system and traces of my previous setup would appear. I thought I was just not paying attention, I was wrong. I performed a clean install and word macros from a reinstall a while ago appear on my word tool bar. When I reinstalled fine print it found a previous install. When I reinstall I choose the option to instal a fresh copy -> format the entire hard drive NTFS. How do I truly go back to the beginning,I still want to have the ability to boot from the CD ROM? Why are the traces of previous installs remaining. Thank you,
d
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Question by:dingo11
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CrazyOne earned 101 total points
ID: 6920621
First remove the NTFS partition

Perhaps this MS KB info may help you

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q103/0/49.asp

BEGIN ARTICLE

SUMMARY
This article describes how to remove Windows NT or Windows 2000 from your computer.

MORE INFORMATION
Before you begin, make sure you know where Windows NT or Windows 2000 is installed, how much of it you want to remove, and how your hard disk is partitioned and formatted. Then, use the information in one of the following sections in this article:

Removing Windows NT or Windows 2000 from the Boot Sequence

Removing a Primary NTFS Partition

Removing Windows NT or Windows 2000 Files

NOTE: If the hard disk contains a partition that uses the NTFS file system, remove this partition in Windows NT or Windows 2000 before removing Windows NT or Windows 2000 from the boot sequence.
Removing Windows NT or Windows 2000 from the Boot Sequence
There are two ways to remove the Windows NT or Windows 2000 boot sector from your computer:
If you want to return to your original MS-DOS configuration, boot MS-DOS and type sys c:. This command replaces the Windows NT or Windows 2000 boot sector with the MS-DOS boot sector, and enables your computer to boot MS-DOS. The following files are left in the root folder and can be deleted after you perform the sys c: operation:

Pagefile.sys
Boot.ini
Ntldr
Ntdetect.com
Ntbootdd.sys

NOTE: The Ntbootdd.sys file is installed only if you have a SCSI Host Adapter installed in Windows NT or Windows 2000.

You can also start your computer with a Microsoft Windows 95 or Microsoft Windows 98 bootable floppy disk and use the sys c: command if you want to return to your original Windows 95 or Windows 98 configuration.

If you want to leave Ntldr on the disk, you can boot MS-DOS without being prompted by changing the startup operating system and time-out value. To do so, start the System tool in Control Panel, click the Startup/Shutdown tab, click MS-DOS in the Startup box, and then type 0 in the Show List For n Seconds box.

NOTE: If the primary partition was converted to NTFS, the only way to return to starting MS-DOS automatically is to reformat the drive and reinstall MS-DOS. See the next section if this is the case.
Removing a Primary NTFS Partition
In general, attempts to modify the primary, bootable NTFS partition do not succeed for the following reasons:
MS-DOS versions 5.0 and 6.0 do not recognize an NTFS partition. The MS-DOS Fdisk program reports an NTFS partition as an OS/2 high-performance file system (HPFS) partition.

You cannot modify or delete an NTFS primary partition within the partition.

To delete or modify a primary NTFS partition, use any of the following methods:
Boot MS-DOS version 6.0 from a floppy disk and press RETURN to continue installing MS-DOS 6. When you are prompted to do so, choose Remove Files.

Initiate Windows NT Setup from floppy disks or a CD-ROM. When you are prompted to do so, press P to remove the partition.

Use the Delpart tool (Delpart.exe) to delete the NTFS partition. The Delpart tool is included with the Microsoft Windows NT 3.1 Resource Kit only. It is not included in the Windows NT 3.5, 3.51 or 4.0 Resource Kits. The Windows NT 3.1 Resource Kit is available for download from the following Web site:


ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/bussys/winnt/winnt-public/reskit/nt31/i386/reskit.exe
Boot OS/2 version 1.x from a floppy disk and run its Fdisk program. To remove the partition, specify the /D option.


Removing Windows NT or Windows 2000 Files
You can remove the following folders to remove Windows NT or Windows 2000 files and free disk space.
Windows NT 3.51 and Earlier
Users
Win32app
Winnt
NOTE: The Winnt folder name may vary. Windows NT or Windows 2000 may be installed in the same folder as Windows 3.1. If this is the case, you should delete only the System32 folder in the Windows folder.
Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000
Users
Winnt
NOTE: The Winnt folder name may vary. Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, and Windows 95 all use the following folders. Delete them only if you are not running or do not intend to keep the Windows 95 installation:




http://www.smartcomputing.com/editorial/article.asp?article=articles%2F1998%2Fnov98%2F1143%2F1143%2Easp

A: The optional NTFS (NT File System) way of partitioning a hard drive differs from both the older DOS FAT16 method and the newer Win95/98 FAT32 method. Although FDISK's purpose is to add and remove partitions (sections of a hard drive that act independently and have different letters), no version of FDISK (not even the newest one with Win98) can "see" or delete an NTFS partition. If you had set up Windows NT (WinNT)and Win95 with FAT16 filing systems, you wouldn't be in this corner. (NOTE: Those contemplating running WinNT 5.0 and Win98 on one system can avoid FAT system incompatibilities such as this by setting them up on FAT32.)

Removing partitions is serious. In case you accidentally kill the wrong partition or make it unbootable, we suggest you back up the Win95 partition before you start. You'll need your three NT Setup diskettes. Put the first diskette in the drive and start the PC; that'll automatically get you into NT's installation procedure. Near the beginning, NT's own partition manager pops up; when it does, select the option for removing partitions. Then, press F3 to exit from the NT installation. Remove the diskette and reboot. Now Win95s FDISK will see the leftover space where the NTFS partition used to be, and you can use it to create FAT16 or FAT32 partitions. If you don't have the setup diskettes but do have the WinNT CD-ROM you can use that to make a new set of startup diskettes. Put the CD-ROM in your drive. Open a DOS window (either in Win95 or NT) and type e: (if E: is your CD-ROM drives letter) and press ENTER, then type cd \i386 and press ENTER to get into the I386 folder. Once there type winnt /ox to force it to make new setup diskettes.

Another option, particularly if you've lost your diskettes and/or can't access your CD-ROM, is to get a third-party partitioning tool such as PartitionMagic or Partition-It. These work on virtually all partition types, including NTFS partitions, and they'll let you adjust partitions' sizes far more easily, without removing software installed on the drive.




http://www.netsys.com/firewalls/firewalls-9610/0604.html

To delete or modify a primary NTFS partition, perform any one of the
following four procedures:

- Boot MS-DOS version 6.0 from a floppy disk and press RETURN to
continue installing MS-DOS 6. When prompted to do so, choose
"Remove files".

- Initiate Windows NT installation from floppy disks or CD-ROM.
When prompted to do so, choose "P" to remove the partition.

- Use the DELPART utility to delete the NTFS partition. DELPART is
provided in the Microsoft Windows NT 3.1 Resource Kit. Note that
DELPART cannot delete a logical drive in the extended partition.

- Boot OS/2 version 1.x from a floppy disk and run its Fdisk program.
To remove the partition, specify the /D option.

NOTE: After you remove the Windows NT boot sector and want more disk space,
you can delete all the files in the %SystemRoot%\System32 directory. If you
want to run Windows NT again, you must reinstall.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE


The Crazy One
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Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 6920624
After words you can use a Win98 boot disk to fdisk and setup a partition.

www.bootdisk.com
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Author Comment

by:dingo11
ID: 6920654
C,
I am looking for the Why as well....That doesn't really explain why traces of my old system do not bite the biscuit when I reinstall. Also, I asked if it was possible to flatten it and reinstall the OS from the CD. I want to keep 2000. I imagine you are trying to be helpful but copying an article and pasting it in is not what I am looking for, a link when applicable, like you have above is perfect. Part of the problem with the article is it really doesn't answer WHY.Thank you for trying,
d
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Author Comment

by:dingo11
ID: 6920664
Hi,
Why isn't a clean install not flattening everything, I thought it decimated the registry? Where are the previous traces stored?
d
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Author Comment

by:dingo11
ID: 6921476
c,
sorry about the rudeness

delpart led me to the following, the link is the method i used in the end http://www.accessdata.com/Product07_HowToWipeADrive.htm with a tool called wipedrv.exe

have a great day,
d
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