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Changing operating system name !

I am using a solaris 8 computer,I did the command sys-unconfig and I changed the configurations,a fter that I tried to unisntall an appliction,but I received a meesage telling me that it is unsupported operating system and it mentioned the name of the operating system wrongly.
My quesiton is :is there a coomand to rename the operating system correctly?
yes I mean that ,although it seems stupid and hopeless.
thanks
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norman2000
Asked:
norman2000
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1 Solution
 
OtetelisanuCommented:
Look man uname
uname -a (all)
for operating system is
Example :
uname -rs
SunOS 5.7
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OtetelisanuCommented:
Look
uname -S

-S system_name

The nodename may be changed by specifying a system
name  argument.  The  system name argument is res-
tricted to SYS_NMLN  characters.  SYS_NMLN  is  an
implementation    specific    value   defined   in
<sys/utsname.h>. Only the  super-user  is  allowed
this capability.
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norman2000Author Commented:
When Iam trying to change it using the command as folowing:
uname -S sunOS
just  the hostname (nodename)is changed ,& it did not change the operating system name.
and when  displaying it by the command
uname -sn
it returns:
 XXX   YYY
where XXX is the operating system name which we want to change .
and the YYY is hostname .
 
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chris_calabreseCommented:
Uname -s changes the hostname of the current computer, not the operating system name.  There is no way to change the operating system name short of editing the kernel image or some such.

Instead, you need to figure out exactly how the uninstall program is determining the OS name and then cheat.

If it's a shell script then you can simply change the script.

If it's a binary that's calling the uname command line program , then you can probably put a fake copy of uname in a directory that you place at the beginning of the PATH before calling the uninstall script.

If it's a binary that's calling the uname() library call, you may be able to edit the binary with a binary editor or link in an alternate version of the uname() library call (by using LD_LIBRARY_PATH).
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masterTCommented:
why don't you just change the files


1)  /etc/hosts

 ipaddress  sunbox  sunbox.domain.com

2)  /etc/nodename

    sunbox

3)  /etc/hostname.hme0

   sunbox
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boxcar7Commented:
I believe the command you want is setuname.  
For example, at a command line, type:
setuname -s MyOS

That will change the OS name to MyOS (from SunOS).
You might want to try just changing the running kernel (ratherher than making a permanent change) by adding the -t parameter to make sure it doesn't break any of your applications that actually make use of the OS name
(i.e. setuname -t -s MyOS).

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chris_calabreseCommented:
Hmm, didn't know about that one.  Just looked at the man pages and looks like it would work, though.  Suggest giving points to boxcar7.
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masterTCommented:
Sorry guys !! I totally misread the question1
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norman2000Author Commented:
I used this command and it worked!
but I have another  problem in the Appache server,I will try to solve it,if i could not i will post it
thanks
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