?
Solved

finding a file

Posted on 2002-04-11
10
Medium Priority
?
186 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-16
How to find all files which is created in December ?
0
Comment
Question by:vrelhan
  • 5
  • 4
10 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6933472
find / -ls|grep " Dec "
# the sring Dec may vary according to your language settings
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6933609
can you please explain this command..
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6933612
can you please explain this command..
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6933628
man find
man grep
man sh     # if you need to know something about pipes
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6933639
can you please explain this command..
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6934094
what should be explained? man?

man man

(it's not a word puzzle, but a real nice unix command)
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:smisk
ID: 6949446
While ahoffman's idea works, it lists all files and only greps out those with a December date.  Here's a more straightforward way :

# assume today is 4/17/02.  this means that 12/1/01 was
# 137 days ago.  also, we know that 12/31/01 was 107 days
# ago.  the find command allows you to filter results based
# upon modification time with the '-ctime' option.
#
# try the following command :

find / -ctime +107 -ctime -137

This command will find every file (starting in the directory / but recursing onward) that was modified between 107*24 hours ago (12/1/01) and 137*24 hours ago (12/31/01) and print out the filename to the screen.

ahoffman is right.  'man find' will tell you a lot about the command and how it can be used.

Note : I'm assuming you want to find files modified (not created) between 12/1/01 and 12/31/01.  If you want to do the search for files modified between 12/1/00 and 12/31/00 you should add the proper number of days (365) to each date...

Hope I cleared this up.

Thanks,
Steve
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6949681
Thanks for the help.. I understand from "man find"

-atime  will give file access time
-mtime  will give file modification time
-ctime  will give the time of last change of file


But as smisk is suspecting, I want file creation time.
Does Unix stores somewhere about the file creation time.

0
 
LVL 51

Accepted Solution

by:
ahoffmann earned 60 total points
ID: 6960889
file creation time can only be accessed by low-level filesystem commands, AFAIK there are no user-level commands

0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6961896
Smisk and ahoffmann helped in my query..Thanks a ton to both of them.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Little introduction about CP: CP is a command on linux that use to copy files and folder from one location to another location. Example usage of CP as follow: cp /myfoder /pathto/destination/folder/ cp abc.tar.gz /pathto/destination/folder/ab…
Cron is one of the most popular and basic utilities found on Unix systems. Combined with other tools, cron makes it exceptionally easy to automate a broad range of tasks on your server.
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
This demo shows you how to set up the containerized NetScaler CPX with NetScaler Management and Analytics System in a non-routable Mesos/Marathon environment for use with Micro-Services applications.
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month8 days, 5 hours left to enroll

616 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question