Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

finding a file

Posted on 2002-04-11
10
Medium Priority
?
184 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-16
How to find all files which is created in December ?
0
Comment
Question by:vrelhan
  • 5
  • 4
10 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6933472
find / -ls|grep " Dec "
# the sring Dec may vary according to your language settings
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6933609
can you please explain this command..
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6933612
can you please explain this command..
0
Veeam Disaster Recovery in Microsoft Azure

Veeam PN for Microsoft Azure is a FREE solution designed to simplify and automate the setup of a DR site in Microsoft Azure using lightweight software-defined networking. It reduces the complexity of VPN deployments and is designed for businesses of ALL sizes.

 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6933628
man find
man grep
man sh     # if you need to know something about pipes
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6933639
can you please explain this command..
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6934094
what should be explained? man?

man man

(it's not a word puzzle, but a real nice unix command)
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:smisk
ID: 6949446
While ahoffman's idea works, it lists all files and only greps out those with a December date.  Here's a more straightforward way :

# assume today is 4/17/02.  this means that 12/1/01 was
# 137 days ago.  also, we know that 12/31/01 was 107 days
# ago.  the find command allows you to filter results based
# upon modification time with the '-ctime' option.
#
# try the following command :

find / -ctime +107 -ctime -137

This command will find every file (starting in the directory / but recursing onward) that was modified between 107*24 hours ago (12/1/01) and 137*24 hours ago (12/31/01) and print out the filename to the screen.

ahoffman is right.  'man find' will tell you a lot about the command and how it can be used.

Note : I'm assuming you want to find files modified (not created) between 12/1/01 and 12/31/01.  If you want to do the search for files modified between 12/1/00 and 12/31/00 you should add the proper number of days (365) to each date...

Hope I cleared this up.

Thanks,
Steve
0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6949681
Thanks for the help.. I understand from "man find"

-atime  will give file access time
-mtime  will give file modification time
-ctime  will give the time of last change of file


But as smisk is suspecting, I want file creation time.
Does Unix stores somewhere about the file creation time.

0
 
LVL 51

Accepted Solution

by:
ahoffmann earned 60 total points
ID: 6960889
file creation time can only be accessed by low-level filesystem commands, AFAIK there are no user-level commands

0
 

Author Comment

by:vrelhan
ID: 6961896
Smisk and ahoffmann helped in my query..Thanks a ton to both of them.
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

rdate is a Linux command and the network time protocol for immediate date and time setup from another machine. The clocks are synchronized by entering rdate with the -s switch (command without switch just checks the time but does not set anything). …
It’s 2016. Password authentication should be dead — or at least close to dying. But, unfortunately, it has not traversed Quagga stage yet. Using password authentication is like laundering hotel guest linens with a washboard — it’s Passé.
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month10 days, 13 hours left to enroll

885 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question