Solved

execute command recursively in subdirs

Posted on 2002-04-11
11
650 Views
Last Modified: 2012-06-21
How can I rename alle files named "*.x" to "*.y" in all subdirs?

I'm looking for a general solution!
I know mmv - but I don't know, if I could use it here.

a solution would be a command that executes the same command in every subdir ...

so I would call:
run_rec mmv "*.x" "#1.y"

thanks
michi
0
Comment
Question by:witty
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • +1
11 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6933465
find ./ -name "*.x" | xargs -i basename {} ".x" | xargs -i mv {}.x {}.y
# or a more UNIXisch solution
find ./ -name \*.x | sed -e 's/\(.*\)\.x/mv & \1.y/'|sh
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:witty
ID: 6933701
well, this is exactly, what I do all the time - but there must exist some better solution - more related to recursivity!!!

thanks
witty
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6934117
KISS - keep it small and simple

why do you warry about the find command? It does exactly what you asked for, not more and not less, exactly.
This with just a few key hits, if you do it recursively you need a script/program with a few hundred bytes. Why?
Find still is recursively, somehow.
An d with a simple  -type f  you can restrict to files. What do you need more?
0
Enterprise Mobility and BYOD For Dummies

Like “For Dummies” books, you can read this in whatever order you choose and learn about mobility and BYOD; and how to put a competitive mobile infrastructure in place. Developed for SMBs and large enterprises alike, you will find helpful use cases, planning, and implementation.

 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:witty
ID: 6934833
I know what you mean - but there MUST exist something without "find -exec" or "xargs"!

nevertheless your command-line wouldn't work (the pwd doesn't change) :-)

thanks
michi
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6934901
> .. MUST exist ..
well, replace find by
    ls -lR
but it's slower, not as flexible etc. etc.
Still do not understand why you need to make things more complicated.

> .. your command-line wouldn't work ..
which did not work?
what did not work?
what is the problem?
both work for me since years, 1'st one only if there is a basename, 2'nd on any UNIX I've ever seen
Keep in mind, that depending on your shell you need to quote parameters and/or escape some special charactzers.

> ..(the pwd doesn't change)
true. Why should it change? There is no reason for it (it just wastes time, or think of directories which a links:)

I gave you 2 perfect solutions to your question, either accept them or give a detailled description with example what you want to do.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:witty
ID: 6935088
ok - why the first line doesn't work:

"basename" is the name without directory.
so the "mv"-command can't work, because it won't find a file with this name in the current directory (because it is in a subdir!)!

and why I don't like it:
xargs is sooo slow, if you have a lot of (and I mean A LOT OF) files!!!

thanks though
michi
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 6935109
agree, basename is not for recursive use, sorry didn't test again.
Did you try my 2'nd example? Probably, depending on shell and/or sed version, needs to be changed to:
  find ./ -name \*.x | sed -e 's#\(.*\)\.x#mv & \1.y#'|sh
0
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:The--Captain
ID: 6949423
This may be easier to understand - always works for me

find -name "*.x" | sed -n -e 's/^\(.*\)\.x$/\1/p' | awk '{print "mv -f " $0 ".x " $0 ".y"}' | sh -x

-Jon
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:witty
ID: 6950111
First of all: thanks to all your comments!

BUT:
these solution are all specific ones - the same I use today!!
(as you can read in my question) I'm looking for a *general solution* to do something like:
run_rec command -options parameters

thanks again
michi
0
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
The--Captain earned 50 total points
ID: 6950224
I think I know what you're saying - you want to just be able to run a cmdline within each directory recursively?

Why not:


#!/bin/bash
find -type d | awk "{print \"export STCD=`pwd` ; cd \" \$0 \" ; $1 ; cd $STCD\"}" | sh -x

Just use the first argument as the command to run and it will run it in every directory recursively - don't forget the quotes if your cmdline has spaces in it...

I called the script rec_cmd and typed:

rec_cmd "touch 'my balls'"

and 'my balls' appeared in every directory recursively...

-Jon

0
 

Expert Comment

by:CleanupPing
ID: 9089092
witty:
This old question needs to be finalized -- accept an answer, split points, or get a refund.  For information on your options, please click here-> http:/help/closing.jsp#1 
EXPERTS:
Post your closing recommendations!  No comment means you don't care.
0

Featured Post

The Eight Noble Truths of Backup and Recovery

How can IT departments tackle the challenges of a Big Data world? This white paper provides a roadmap to success and helps companies ensure that all their data is safe and secure, no matter if it resides on-premise with physical or virtual machines or in the cloud.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Setting up Secure Ubuntu server on VMware 1.      Insert the Ubuntu Server distribution CD or attach the ISO of the CD which is in the “Datastore”. Note that it is important to install the x64 edition on servers, not the X86 editions. 2.      Power on th…
Fine Tune your automatic Updates for Ubuntu / Debian
Connecting to an Amazon Linux EC2 Instance from Windows Using PuTTY.
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.

832 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question