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Designing a multi regional site

Posted on 2002-04-17
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Last Modified: 2010-04-09
I have a dilemma.

I have to create a website that will be global in general, however some of the information may be regional, meaning they will be different.

For example, we use different telephone services in the US than in Europe, so under telephone services, there should be two different pages, one for europe and one for US.

I could make two completely different sites: but that would be duplicating the work that should be the same.  

Any suggestions on how I can incorporate the different instructions by region without duplcating efforts??

Also if you know of any other website that deals with this would be appreciated.
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Question by:tchous
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Accepted Solution

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webwoman earned 200 total points
ID: 6948221
User server side includes, and have them come from a main page where they pick the language.

When they pick the language, set a cookie. Use this to determine which includes they get.

Then the structure remains the same, the common elements remain the same, but the content presented can change based on what they choose.

You really can't depend on checking IP, or trying to figure out what they want. You never know -- I might be in the US on business, getting ready to head back to Europe, and looking for info. Or vice versa. Or I could be doing research.

You could check the cookie in each page, and if it's not set drop them back to the main page, then directly to the page they initially wanted. That would let those who find a page through a search engine customize what they need.

Let the users pick what version they want.
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Expert Comment

by:pleasenospam
ID: 6971736
Why not set up a simple menu and let the user choose which URL to follow?
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Expert Comment

by:webwoman
ID: 6972705
Well, basically you would -- but the content would be generated dynamically, so the URL would be the same, but the content included would vary based on what they picked in the first page.

Makes maintenance a whole lot easier...
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Author Comment

by:tchous
ID: 6983157
I think what you are say should work, but i don't want to create two pages that contain the same information.  

Also I will be the developer, but there will be a lot of non-developers adding content. I don't it to be confusing for them..
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Expert Comment

by:COBOLdinosaur
ID: 7047959
This question has been abandoned. I will make a recommendation to the
moderators on its resolution in a week or two. I appreciate any comments
that would help me to make a recommendation.

Cd&
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Author Comment

by:tchous
ID: 7059618
Not really the answer I was looking for, but it got me off to the right start..
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:COBOLdinosaur
ID: 7059763
A C grade, because you would prefer that the answer be different is a good way to encourage experts to ignore you future questions.  You have a lot to learn about developing usful relationships with people that want to help you.  

Most top experts consider grading history when deciding who they should provide their time to, and this kind of gross undergrading hurts your chances of getting top-experts to help you in the future.

Cd&
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Expert Comment

by:pleasenospam
ID: 7060677
I have mixed feelings about grading.  Life isn't fair, and adults should get used
to that fact.  The job of a good teacher is to present material in such a way
that the student, ANY student, can understand what is being taught.  I see
a lot of comment answers posted at EE that provide laundry lists of external references
for the user to wade through.  Other comments are vague or downright obscure.

My point, however, is that it seems to me that many of the younger experts are
graduates of a public school system where nobody is allowed to fail.  I
call the syndrome the "self esteem scam".

Many years ago in Massachusetts a co-worker cautioned me about the fallacy of expecting
"browny point" laurels for a job well done.  He explained that paychecks arrived every
Friday and that I should expect no more than that.

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LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:webwoman
ID: 7061009
It's not that. If the answer was incomplete perhaps the grade would be warranted. It wasn't. The fact that they don't like isn't a rationale for giving a bad grade.

And if my employer doesn't give me SOME feedback for a job well done, I'm not likely to stay there very long. I'm not a doormat. Yes, I expect a paycheck -- but I also expect that extra effort will be at LEAST noticed.
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Expert Comment

by:COBOLdinosaur
ID: 7061917
It is not a grading system like school.  A C was the lowest grade that could be given.  That equates to unaceptable. If the content is correct and the expert presented it well, How can that be unacceptable.  If there is dissatisfaction with the limits of the technology, then the manufacture of the technology should receive a failing grade not the expert who delivers correct information about those limitations.

Cd&
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Expert Comment

by:pleasenospam
ID: 7063028
I'm not picking on this thread in particular, but on the idea of DEMANDING good
grades for nearly every thread.  I see a trend here and in the school systems that
isn't realistic.  The world is a ruthless place, and we often forget that fact
because we live in an environment that requires little effort because our ancestors
slaved like dogs under miserable conditions.

Many years ago I was a highway designer.  The man at the next drafting table told
me about incidents during depression years.  It seems that an engineer begged his
boss for a raise because he had a daughter in college.  His boss told him that he
could be replaced many times over for somebody more qualified who would be
willing to work for half his wages.
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:COBOLdinosaur
ID: 7063187
Yes well wages equates to points. This is not about points.  From my contact with the top-experts on the site I find that there is a common path that most of us move along.  There is a point along that path where the points do not motivate.  At that crossroad, expert proceed in different directions.  For some, the site loses its appeal, and they move on or cut back activity. For others they gravitate towards the discussion threads and lounge.  The final group, end up in the HOF and in top-15s. They find they are motivated by the pleasure they get from users who appreciate and respect them; and the support they get from other top-experts in the community.

I don't expect anyone to understand that except another top-expert.  Is that arrogant or elitist?  Probably.  The point is that whether a user understands that or not, they need to be aware of it.  We don't work for wages here; money or points. It gives us pleasure.  If three Questions are posted:  user A -- 200 points  does not grade fairly;  user B 400 points  does not respond until a week later, and changes the requirements;  User C -- 50 points  known as a fair grader who helps with their own solution.

B gets a short comment, a request for clarification, and I'll come back when they are ready to have it worked on.  C gets whatever effort is necessary to find a solution even if the Q is much more difficult then the points indicate.  If there is time left over A get get a few minutes, though that may be just to post a comment warning other experts about grading history.

It does not matter what you think of the grade.  It matters what I think because I will make the decsion on who to help.  Any analogy that centers around school or work is defective because there is a requirement to complete tasks for reward.  I am not compelled to do anything I choose to participate based on past history, not the potential for future reward.

Cd&
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Expert Comment

by:webwoman
ID: 7063802
I equate the points more to somebody who asks for advice, gets it, and then complains to their other friends because it wasn't what they wanted to hear.

Or a teacher who grades someone low not because they don't know the work, but because they don't like the person.

Or an amployer who gives you a poor/mediocre evaluation even though you're the one who does all the work.

And all those situations I leave -- as fast as I can.

Cd& is right -- none of us have to be here, nor do we have to answer questions. It costs NOTHING to give a good grade. If the answer doesn't solve your problem, you don't have to accept it. If it DOES solve the problem, it's by definition (to me, at least) worth an A or a B.
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Author Comment

by:tchous
ID: 7092715
I'm confused. I issued a C because the answer did not get me the information i was looking for. It was accepted because at least it gave me the ability to start looking at other options.

If I offended someone with a grade, I apologize. I probably made the mistake of accepting it incorrectly if anything..
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