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RedHat 7.1 Problem

Posted on 2002-04-22
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I accidentally moved (instead of copy) all the files from my /lib directory to /tmp.  Now I'm unable to log in to the system.

Can I create a boot disk from another RedHat system, and use that to gain access to the file system of the ailing machine, then copy the files back?

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Question by:Zoplax
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iandunn earned 200 total points
ID: 6960834
Creating a boot disk from another RH box might work assuming it's running the same kernel. If not, you can try a couple things:

1) If you're using LILO, at the prompt type "linux single", where "linux" is the whatever label you gave the RedHat instillation in question when you set it up. "Linux" is the default.

2) Create a root disk. It's like a generic boot disk that'll let you mount the partition and copy files. Tom's RTBT is a good one; you can download it at http://www.toms.net/rb/

3) Boot to your RedHat CD. I think there's a rescue option somewhere in there which'll boot the kernel and you can mount the partition and copy the files back.
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by:Zoplax
ID: 6961860
I tried Tom's RTBT but it didn't quite do the trick; I didn't have info handy on the partitions on the system which needed to be mounted.  

I used the RedHat boot CD though and that worked great; it enumerated the existing file system and allowed me to undo the damage I did.

Thanks for the quick help.  :D
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