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move /usr to its own slice.

What is the best way to move /usr to its own slice?
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pshirmey
Asked:
pshirmey
1 Solution
 
jlevieCommented:
This is something that is best done wile in single user mode and the tool of choice is dump (or ufsdump on Solaris). Assuming that the new location for /usr already has had a filesystem made on the slice you'd do something like:

# mount /dev/??? /mnt
# cd /mnt
# dump 0f - /usr | restore rf -

Some implementations of dump don't allow for one to specify other that a mount point as the source. For those systems tar is appropriate, as in:

# mount /dev/??? /mnt
# cd /usr
# tar cf - . | (cd /mnt; tar xpf -)

When the copy is finished modify /etc/fstab or /etc/vfstab as appropriate to mount the new location of /usr. To keep from covering the space that usr is currently occupying, so you can delete the contents, rename /usr to be /old-usr. Then reboot and when you see that everything works 'rm -r /old-usr'.
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elfieCommented:
if you want to have a short 'down' time.

you can first copy data using "cpio -pvdum".

Then going for the single user mode and use "cpio pvdm" to copy over the modified files.

Don't forget to the fstab/vfstab or volume group definitions.
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stan64Commented:
use cpio over tar because tar will not take the empty directories.
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jlevieCommented:
If you have a tar that doesn't handle empty directories, then you have a broken tar implementation. Handling empty directories is required in a sparsely populated directory tree and if the empty directories can't be stored in the archive and extracted then that implementation of tar is simply broken and not usable.
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pshirmeyAuthor Commented:
Okay,  I did the ufsdump and ufsrestore to the new slice, and that worked great!  But the /mnt now has a file "restoresymtable" and a usr directory.  So if I mount the slice to /usr the effective path to usr is /usr/usr.

Thanks for all the help so far!
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pshirmeyAuthor Commented:
Okay,  I did the ufsdump and ufsrestore to the new slice, and that worked great!  But the /mnt now has a file "restoresymtable" and a usr directory.  So if I mount the slice to /usr the effective path to usr is /usr/usr.

Thanks for all the help so far!
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jlevieCommented:
No problem... you can remove the restoresymtable file and then do:

cd /mnt
mv usr/* .
rmdir usr
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vinnyd79Commented:
%listening
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pshirmeyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all your help!
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