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variable in from clause

I'm having trouble in VB6 with an access db using a variable (TableName$) in the FROM clause of a SQL statement.

Set rs = dbmath.OpenRecordset("Select Password,Number, First, Last  FROM  TableName$  where First = '" & TeacherFirst.Text & "' and Last = '" & TeacherLast.Text & " ' ")

What is the correct syntax?

Mathprof
0
mathprof
Asked:
mathprof
1 Solution
 
EvlichCommented:
Try this...
Set rs = dbmath.OpenRecordset("Select Password,Number, First, Last  FROM "& TableName$ &" where First =
'" & TeacherFirst.Text & "' and Last = '" & TeacherLast.Text & " ' ")
Hope that it helps.
~Evlich
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rspahitzCommented:
Evlich is correct.

If it helps in the future, you may want to break things down into smaller pieces:

' First define constants which can be carried from code to code or defined globally
Const cSelectVerb as string = "SELECT "
const cFromVerb as string = " FROM "
const cWhereVerb as string = " WHERE "

' Now define variable pieces:
Dim strSelectFieldList as string
dim strWhereClause as string

strSelectFieldList = "Password,Number, First, Last  "
strWhereClause = cWhereVerb & "First = '" & TeacherFirst.Text & "' and Last = '" & TeacherLast.Text & "'"

' Now assemble all the pieces:

Set rs = dbmath.OpenRecordset(cSelectVerb & strSelectFieldList & cFromVerb & TableName$ & strWhereClause)

--
And if the where clause gets too complex, you could break that down in the same way as the select:

const cFieldName1 as string = " First "
const cFieldName2 as string = " Last "
const cAndVerb as string = " AND "
const cEquateVerb as string = "="

dim strFieldValue1 as string
dim strFieldValue2 as string

strFieldValue1 = "'" & TeacherFirst.Text & "'"
strFieldValue2 = "'" & TeacherLast.Text & "'"

strWhereClause = cWhereVerb & cFieldName1 & cEquateVerb & strFieldValue1 & cAndVerb & cFieldName2 & cEquateVerb & strFieldValue2

--
This may look confusing at first, but it's general-purpose enough that you could turn it into a function which assembled all the pieces for you and returns the correct SQL string.  That's a bit overkill for simply queries, but if you do a lot, it may be worthwhile.
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mathprofAuthor Commented:
Thanks you !. It worked.
And thank you too, RSPAHITZ, for helping out someone very new to SQL.
Mathprof
0

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