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How do I view file changes as they happen

Posted on 2002-04-25
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Hello all

I wonder if someone could help. I am interested in echoing the contents of a log file to my screen, and to be able to see any additional information added to the file, being added to my screen simultaneously.
I am not in control of the process which is writing to the log file.
Also can you do the same thing with a screen, so view data on one screen as it scrolls up on another.
I am using HPUX 11

Thanks

Richard
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Question by:richardmoz
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jlevie earned 100 total points
ID: 6968348
Watching for new data as it is added to a file is pretty easy, just use 'tail -f some-log'. For your second question, yes if your are using X you can have the same file visible in two terminal windows. You could do 'more some-log' in one window and 'tail -f' in another.
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by:richardmoz
ID: 6968359
Thanks jlevie
I'm going to have to study those command line options more carefully.
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