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partioning of 40 GB hard drive

I need to partition a 40 GB WD hard drive to work with win 98 and NT 4.0.(dual boot system)

I would like to have

Four   5 GB fat32 partitions   win 98 only
Four   5 GB fat16 partitions   win 98 and NT 4.0
   
  I have an old copy of Partition Magic(4 years old) and the new 40 GB drive will be a slave drive. (kids games and pictures)

   How do I do what I want to do?

Thanks
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kickback
Asked:
kickback
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1 Solution
 
lyonstCommented:
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lyonstCommented:
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Crash2100Commented:
are you saying you want two win 98 installations?
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
I have win 98 and NT 4.0 installed on a 10 gig
drive and I have two kids griping at me about disk
space. I want to maintain this basic setup and use the new
hard drive for extra space for both operating systems

Thanks

Kickback
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fracheCommented:
STOP! ->You can't create 8 partitions on one disk ...

The limit to the number of primary partitions is unfortunately quite low. You can have only 4 primary partitions.
You must create primary and extended partition and after logical drives in extended partition.

But in my opinion, it's a good thing to share a harddisk with too many partitions or logical drives ...
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pjknibbsCommented:
One thing no-one else has pointed out is that NT 4 does not understand FAT32, so you'll need to do two things:

1) Have a boot partition which is FAT16 so the NT boot loader can correctly set up its dual boot stuff.
2) The maximum size of a FAT16 partition in Windows NT is 4Gb, and if you create a partition of this size you can't reliably access it from Windows 98--therefore you could be in trouble here as well.

If you want the reliability of NT with the capability of accessing FAT32 partitions you'll need to invest in a copy of Windows 2000 or XP, unfortunately.
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fracheCommented:
Sorry :
You must read ...

But in my opinion, it's NOT a good thing to share a harddisk with too many partitions or logical drives
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Jason_SCommented:
Why so many partitions?  You should only need three.  One FAT16 at 2048MB for dual boot functionality, One FAT32 for Windows 98 at 19Gig, and another NTFS at 19Gig for Windows NT.

Be aware that the NT system will not see the FAT32 drive, and the 98 system will not see the NTFS drive.  Both will see the Fat16 drive.

You can do this all without Partition Magic.  FDISK will start you out, then Windows 98, then finally Windows NT.
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
I did a lot of experimenting last night and reading of similar q & a's. I was confused about logical drives within a partition. FDISK seems to be the right tool, the WD HD software tool is basically useless.

  I'm going to try Jason S reccomendation and will report back.

  Thanks for the comments so far.
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Crash2100Commented:
this fdisk tutorial might be helpful:
http://www.firmware.com/support/bios/fdisk.htm
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
I finally got the hard drive formatted through the following sequence of actions:

1. Used WD software on floppy  to erase disk and create 2 GB FAT16 partition at start of drive

2. Used Partition Magic to creat an 8 GB NTFS partition after the FAT partition

3. Used NT 4.0 to format  the NTFS partition

4. Booted into DOS in Win98 and used FDISK to create an extended  DOS partition from the remaining space on the drive. Then created three logical drives 10GB, 10 GB, and 8 GB in the extended partition

5. Used win98 to format the three logical drives as FAT32

6. Used NT 4.0 disk administrator  to coorect some drive letter assignment changes that somehow creapt in
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
This answer from Jason S was close to what I finally did and pointed me in the right direction.

  The earlier comments were also helpful.

Thanks
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Jason_SCommented:
Glad to help.

As far as drive letter assignments, NT will allow you to change them, but 98 will not.  Here is an explanation on how both the system BIOS, and 98 will see the drives.

In DOS, and Windows 9X based systems, drive letters are assigned as follows.

Primary Master's Primary partition is assigned C:

Primary Slave's Primary partition (if present) is assigned next.

Secondary Master's Primary partition (if present) is assigned next.

Secondary Slave's Primary partition (if present) is assigned next.

Primary Master's Extended partitions (if present) are assigned next.  If only one, it would get the next available drive letter.  If multiple, they would also be assigned next.

Primary Slave's Extended partitions (if present) are assigned next.  If only one, it would get the next available drive letter.  If multiple, they would also be assigned next.

Secondary Master's Extended partitions (if present) are assigned next.  If only one, it would get the next available drive letter.  If multiple, they would also be assigned next.

Secondary Slave's Extended partitions (if present) are assigned next.  If only one, it would get the next available drive letter.  If multiple, they would also be assigned next.

To manipulate this, you could partition the second hard drive with only extended partitions.  That way, you could have C:, D: on the Primary Master, and E:, F: on the second drive.

NTFS partitions do not come into play with this, and drive letters are passed over.
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kickbackAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the additional comments
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