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problem installing dhcp server

I have a redhat 7.1 installed system with enough RAM processor etc... But when ever i try to install the dhcp rpm package i get the error segmentation fault , core dumpded... i have tried some other cd ( assuming the cd was bad ) but that does not help... by the way the other cd was redhat 7.0... somebody please help cos i got to get the dhcp server soon...
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harisnshaw
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harisnshaw
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jlevieCommented:
Can you use rpm to install any package from your 7.1 CD or a network resource? I know that the dhcp rpm on the 7.1 distribution is okay, so it is likely that something is wrong with your OS installation.

Has anything been installed on top of your 7.1 system that isn't a part of the 7.1 distro? By that I mean have you downloaded any rpms or locally built and installed anything?
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harisnshawAuthor Commented:
i have updated my xserver and kde. Apart from that I have installed nothing else. I tried reinstalling xmms from the redhat 7.1 ... and that worked fine. I feek there is some problem with my system configuration ... but i have not clue about it.... Also i searched the net and got the DHCP source code... problem is i don't know to compile it.
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jlevieCommented:
Are you using a command line invocation of rpm or a Gui tool?  The latter could be a problem since the X server and KDE have been changed from RedHat's version. Also how much free space do you have on the system?
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harisnshawAuthor Commented:
yes now that u mentioned i have only 93 MB... is that not enough???? i tried the gui tool first and then the command line.
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jlevieCommented:
93Mb free should be be enough although that's pushing the edge of the envelope. The actual dhcp server isn't that big once it is installed, but rpm needs work space to unpack the package and room in /var to rebuild the database as a part of the install.

I can't think of anything other than a space problem, a problem with the CD or something wrong with rpm (like a corrupt database) that would cause rpm to drop core.The first thing I'd try is to download a clean copy of the dhcp rpm from ftp://ftp.redhat.com/pub/redhat/linux/7.1/en/os/i386/RedHat/RPMS/dhcp-2.0pl5-4.i386.rpm and see if that helps. Next I might try rebuilding the rpm ddatabase with 'rpm --rebuilddb'.
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harisnshawAuthor Commented:
got the problem .... when i try to rebuild the database with rpm --rebuilddb i again get
segmnetation fault... core dumped... now what do i do... do i have to reinstall the whole redhat once again?
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jlevieCommented:
That's not good... and the question is why. I've used 7.1 enough to know that a standard installation on well behaving hardware shouldn't be having that kind of problem. Given that you upgraded X and KDE, presumably via non-RedHat rpms, I'm suspicious that something related to those upgrades may have changed some system lib that rpm depends on. I can't say for sure that's the problem, only that it's likely.

I think that what I'd do at this point is to do a clean install of 7.1 (or 7.2 if you want the later version of X). I'd also lay out the disk partitions so as to have about 300-500MB free where / lives and I'd make at least /var a separate partition of 300Mb or a bit more. My typical layout for a 7.1 desktop looks something like:

/boot  - 20MB
/      - 2000MB
swap   - 256MB or twice memory, which is larger
/var   - 500MB
/home  - free space

Servers for specific purposes, like an email or web server, will be partioned a bit different, depending on what the box needs to do.

As soon as the install completes the very next thing that I do is to get and install all applicable RedHat errata and updates. That can be done with up2date or manually, but it is important to get those installed to close security holes and to eliminate known problems.

By and large I'm quite reluctant to install major system components, like X, KDE, or a kernel that aren't a part of a RedHat distribution or its errata on anything other than a 'throw away' desktop system. Something that crucial to system use may well conflict with RedHat's utilities and break something that I really need. Again, I don't know that the upgrades are the problem here, only that it's a good possibility.
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harisnshawAuthor Commented:
thanks a lot for the support.... I am reinstalling the whole thing today...
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