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newbie string question

Posted on 2002-05-03
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Last Modified: 2010-04-02
Hello all
I'm trying to use strings because I feel more comfortable with them - char* stuff is still a bit of a mystery.
This is using g++ no a Unix box.
Anyways, I have a header file - this.h:
#ifndef THIS
#define THIS

class x
{
   public:
     bool this();
     int that(int);
     string theOther(string);  //call this line 5
     bool someThing(string);   //line 6
}
#endif

and a .cc file - this.cc:
#include <string.h>
#include "this.h"

string this::theOther(string str)   //call this line 7
{
   //...
}

when I try to compile this.cc, the compiler says
this.h:5: syntax error before '('
this.h:6: 'string' was not declared in this scope
this.h:6: invalid data member initialization
this.h:6: use '=' to initialize static data members
this.cc:7: syntax error before '::'

Why all the grief about strings?
I even tried adding #include <string.h> to the .h file, but that didn't help.  
The points go to whomever can tell me how to get strings working in this context.
Thanks

v
0
Comment
Question by:vlg
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12 Comments
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 6988761
"this" is a language keyword.

Change the name to something else besides "this"
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 6988762
Also your return types don't match.
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 6988765
You're also missing a simicolon at the end of your class declaration.
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LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 6988772
For starters, here how you can setup your header.

#ifndef MY_HEADER_GAURD_FOR_X_CLASS
#define MY_HEADER_GAURD_FOR_X_CLASS

#include <string>  //Link to <string> and NOT <string.h>

class x
{
public:
    bool SomeNameOtherThenThis();
    int that(int);
     std::string theOther(std::string);  //Use std:: namespace when using stl code in header
    bool someThing(std::string);   //Use std:: namespace when using stl code in header
};

#endif //MY_HEADER_GAURD_FOR_X_CLASS
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 6988792
continue ....

#include <string> //Use <string> instead of <string.h>
#include "my_header.h"

std::string x::theOther(std::string str)//change "this" to x
{
  //...
     return "";
}
0
 

Author Comment

by:vlg
ID: 6988964
Axter -

Thanks for the help.
One quick question:
you said that in the .cc file I also have to:
std::string x::theOther(std::string str)//change "this" to x
{
 //...
    return "";
}
even though I'm including the library file:
#include <string> //Use <string> instead of <string.h>
?
I'm obviously going to follow the rules, but I'm curious as to why I have to use
std::string x::someFunction(std::string str)
when I #include<string> at the top of the file?
What good is including the file doing for me?

v
0
 
LVL 30

Accepted Solution

by:
Axter earned 400 total points
ID: 6989048
>>when I #include<string> at the top of the file?
>>What good is including the file doing for me?

If you have the include<string> in the header (*.h), then you don't need it in the *.cpp file.

I'm not exactly sure if that answers your question.  If not, please restate the question.
0
 

Author Comment

by:vlg
ID: 6989134
close -
what I meant was, if I'm #including it in the header file, then:
1) why does it also (as in your example above) also have to be in the .cc file, and if it is in either/both places, why do I still have to preface all the string stuff with "std::"?

that's the only thing - I'm just curious - the points will be yours whether you know the answer or not, so no need to make something up if you don't know - just curious

thanks

v
0
 

Author Comment

by:vlg
ID: 6989142
weird - now I can't see that comment you added about having to check the string length or something with stol(?) - it was similar to the comment posted by the other person - and I can't see his comment now, either!

Yikes - can you please repost it, Axter? - I'll never figure out what you were talking about without that comment.
thanks
0
 

Author Comment

by:vlg
ID: 6989147
oops - ignore that last request for a repost - my bad
only the question about the inclusion remains.

v
0
 

Author Comment

by:vlg
ID: 6989314
if you have the time - i'm stil curious about the question...
but thanks in any event!
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Axter
ID: 6989377
>>why does it also (as in your example above) also have to be in the .c

It doesn't need to be in both.  You can just keep it in the *.h file.

>>why do I still have to preface all the string stuff
>>with "std::"?

You need the prefix because it's in the std namespace.

If you don't want to use the prefix you can use a using-statement.
Example:
using namespace std;

But I don't recommend that you do this in the header.  Only in the *.cpp file.

You should always avoid bring a namespace into the gobal area in the header, because this conficts with the author's intentions.
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