ATX power supplies

I have recently acquired a number of these power units 250 to 300 watts there is
no visible on &off switch except for one which is on the rear of one of these units ,i plug these
units into a wall receptacle, none will start while looking, at the fan.What need i have to do? install to
motherboard or are these units just   [history].  I have four these units,what are the chances of four
failures.
billmoyerAsked:
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WakeupSpecialist 1Commented:
Also since they are ATX Powersupply, there usually is a two pronged jumper looking thing comming from the Powersupply cables, usually shorting that together will also cause it to power up.  To turn it off short it again.  Or unplug or use the power switch on the back.  Generally ATX systems switches just short the cable to turn it on and short again to turn it off.
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jhanceCommented:
1) An ATX power supply MAY have a power switch on the back but that will not be the only switch.  There should be a black lead coming out that has 4 wires with female spade connectors on them.  These connect to the case switch.

To power up the supply, connect the BLACK and BROWN ones together and then the other two (usually BLUE and WHITE) together.

Note, however, that as with ALMOST ALL switcher power supplies, you may not get output under no load.
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oldgreyguyCommented:
I was taught thru the years of ATX power supplies, to not fire them up without a load.

I bought a couple of these things for testing them

http://www.antec-inc.com/acesory.html
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jhanceCommented:
Let me RETRACT my earlier comment.  I read "ATX" but thought "AT" in my head.  Wakeup's comment "woke me up"....

ATX supplies must be plugged into a motherboard AND have their "soft" power on switch closed.  They CAN be tested without a motherboard but you must "fool" them into thinking they are plugged into one.

See:

http://www.cyberguys.com/cgi-bin/sgin0101.exe?UID=2002050503165136&GEN6=00&GEN9=5CG01&FNM=00&T1=115+3112&UREQA=1&UREQB=2&UREQC=3&UREQD=4

for an example of a device that you can use to test ATX power supplies without risking a motherboard.
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WakeupSpecialist 1Commented:
Yup...That is correct.  You can fool with it to get it to turn on... I have done this to test them in the past.  I had to short the little jumper like I stated earlier.  If it powers up....we know it at least powers up...hehe
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billmoyerAuthor Commented:
Your comment did the trick for two power units,still need to work out the others,don't now why i can't understand these appications.

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