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40-wire versus 80-wire IDE cable

Posted on 2002-05-06
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
Last year I installed a hard drive for a friend. The HD has, I believe, an ATA-100 interface(if I have that correct), and came with an 80-pin cable.
Now, his newer Abit board could support the interface, but the 80-pin cable was simply not long enough, so I used his previous 40-pin cable. HD works fine.
Question: how much of a performance hit, so-to-speak, did I create by not getting him a longer 80-pin cable?

Thanks

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Question by:pallidin
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by:stevenlewis
ID: 6992820
By doing so, you forced it to ATA 66
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Wakeup earned 100 total points
ID: 6993280
You can also refer to this EE question:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/hardgen/Q.20297188.html

It is not closed yet so you may still be able to take a peak before it gets closed or graded.

Basically here are some of the highlights:
Yes you should be able to use the 80 pin connector on older drives,
and on most newer drives you can still use the older 40 pin connector however you lose some speed, and
some drives MAY NOT detect properly according to the web sites.

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCable80-c.html
http://www.ramelectronics.net/html/ata-66_cables.htm

It will explain the differences between ATA133, 100 and 66.

This site explains what happens when you use an 40pin or 80 pin connector:
http://cweb.msi.com.tw/eforum/tip/tip5.htm

Anyway, hope that helps you figure things out.

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by:mnasman
ID: 6993324
Hello

  I tried that before
 
 When i connect the HD using the 40wire cable, the bios tell me the HD is ATA 33, but with the 80 wire cable it's will be ATA 66

  so i think the HD now with the 40 wire cable working as ATA 33, and you lost the performance cuz there's big different between ATA 100 and ATA 33

best regards
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by:pallidin
ID: 6995352
Wakeup, once again you seems to have given great info.

From the links I have found that:
a) the proper terminology is 80-conductor, not 80-pin, as the connector has only 40-pins.
b) The extra 40 conductors are interspersed with the 40 "signal" wires and connected to ground in order to help eliminate "crosstalk" at higher data transfer rates.
c) The use of a 40-conductor cable with a hard drive that recommends 80 will default that drive to ATA 33.
d) Special attention must be paid to how the connectors of the 80-conductor cable are attached(black to the Master drive, grey to the Slave, and blue to either the motherboard or host controller.

Thanks
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