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Partition advice

Posted on 2002-05-08
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I am going to be setting up a internal server for my company.  I am going to be using redhat 7.3. I have a 120GB hard drive.  I was wondering what suggestions people had for setting up the partitions.  Basiclly which one's should have there own partition and what size should it be?

There are about 8 people who will be saving stuff to the server.  I really want to know about the OS side of things. I will create one big /home directory and split everyone's personal files in there.

Thanks Onestar
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Question by:onestar
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by:fremsley
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The directory tree on Unix-like machines constits in
general of two types of sub-trees:

  a) constant data
  b) variable data

The constant data trees contain stuff like configuration
data, applications, etc. -- these are usually only modified
when updating the system, installing software and the like.
Typical canditates are:

   /, /bin, /etc, /usr, /usr/local /opt, ...

Variable data is usually found in places like:

  /var, /tmp, /home, ...

A good choice for partitioning could be to keep constant
and variable data separate, so the former one can be
mounted in read-only mode for normal operation.

Which sub-trees should reside in partitions of their own
and how much space they need depends on what kind of
software you are using -- personally I prefer splitting
the system into many small partition and mount them
together.

Hope this helps

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by:onestar
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Thanks for the comment.  It is a start.  I understand what you have said.  My biggest question is how much space is enough for each constant data?  For example lets say I install everything on the cd's (which I won't).  I will probably install a few other pieces of software but not a lot.  This computer is mainly going to be server for data storage.  I might use it a little bit but it will not be an everyday workstation.
I know this is tough to answer but I am just looking for an educated guess.  I don't want to make /bin 2 megs and then somesays I should of made it 2 gigs.  I am exagerating here but you get my point.


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hnminh earned 50 total points
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if you did play a round with earlier version of RH, you should be noticed RH use this structure

/  - ~256MB
/var  - ~256MB
/boot - ~50MB
swap - usually double size of amount of RAM
/home - half of the left
/usr - the other half

I copied this structure with some changes. Keep the /boot size, nothing will be added in there since server up and run. / would take 500MB because it keep /tmp folder and for other kind of server, like a busy web server, /tmp have to keep a lot of session data for ex. /var should also be ~500MB so that you wont have to worry much about huge log files. /usr is where all software are, to my experience this partition would not need more than 8GB to install everything from installation CD. The swap partition is kept as is unless I would install oracle server. And the rest of HD space will be /home.... Hope you catch my ideas
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