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Freeing up files on / directory...

Posted on 2002-05-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
This is my partition setup according to the df utility:

Filesystem  1M-blocks    Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc1         251     249         0 100% /
/dev/sda1          53       8        42  16% /boot
/dev/sde5        4764     292      4230   7% /home
/dev/sde6        4764    2038      2484  46% /usr
/dev/sdd1        8539     279      7827   4% /var

I'd like to increase the size of the root directory so that I've got more space.  According to cfdisk, the hard drive physically has plenty of free space available:

Disk Drive: /dev/sdc
Size: 9105018880 bytes
Heads: 255   Sectors per Track: 63   Cylinders: 1106

Name    Flags    Part Type   FS Type        [Label]     Size (MB)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
sdc1     Boot    Primary     Linux ext2     [/]           271.44    
                 Pri/Log     Free Space                  8825.73


I need to know specifically how to boost the size of the "/" partition.  Is it safe just to maximize the size of "/" and have it use up all the additional free space?  This computer is pretty recent (no old BIOS) and is using SCSI drives (with fairly recent Adaptec controllers).
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Question by:Zoplax
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dorward earned 34 total points
ID: 6997846
I don't think its possible to non-destructivly resize ext2 partitions, if it is you should be using GNU Parted, not cfdisk.

A better bet might be to find out what is using up the space (du -h is good here). It could be something that you can create a new parition for (/opt is a likely suspect)
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by:samri
samri earned 33 total points
ID: 6997962
I believe PowerQuest PartitionMagic should be able to do it.  I just resize mine, with PQMagic7.0, it works fine.

cheers.
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by:ahoffmann
ahoffmann earned 33 total points
ID: 6998224
AFAIK there is no save way for resizing /, all tools are still in beta, so take care.
The simplest way is o go into single user mode and move/copy some directories to another partition, like /opt, /usr,
A better, but more time consuming way is, to boot from CD, floppy, whatever, then remove the / partition and generate it new.
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by:Zoplax
ID: 6999799
Ok, it looks like my only option is to enlarge the "/" partition.  I've already tried searching for stuff safe to delete (e.g. the /opt dir) but no go.

I've used PM 7 before but never with a Linux partition, so I'd prefer to try Parted for now and failing that use PM.

I've been investigating Parted; it seems like this util might do what I need; could someone explain for me how exactly I would use it to grow the "/" partition into the free space on /dev/sdc1 (see partition details above)?
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Expert Comment

by:samri
ID: 7000279
Zeleps partition manager (http://www.zeleps.com/), it claimed it works on ext2 (linux partition).  And its free.  Make sure you use 1.3.3 (read the IMPORTANT notes).
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by:fremsley
ID: 7006402
If you have some free unpartitioned space on the drive, why
don't you just create a new partition, mount it somewhere,
move an entire directory tree from your root partition
(e.g. /opt) to the new partition, and remount it in the
proper place (e.g. /opt)? The 250MB should be sufficient
for a root partition when all big file systems (/usr, /opt,
/var, /home, ...) reside in partitions of their own.

Hope this helps
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by:CleanupPing
ID: 9077013
Zoplax:
This old question needs to be finalized -- accept an answer, split points, or get a refund.  For information on your options, please click here-> http:/help/closing.jsp#1 
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by:drewber
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This question has been classified abandoned. I will make a recommendation to the moderators on its resolution in a week or two. I appreciate any comments that would help me to make a recommendation.
 

Unless it is clear to me that the question has been answered I will recommend delete. It is possible that a Grade less than A will be given if no expert makes a case for an A grade. It is assumed that any participant not responding to this request is no longer interested in its final disposition.

 
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by:paullamhkg
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No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.
I will leave the following recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area:

Split: dorward {http:#6997846} & samri {http:#6997962} & ahoffmann {http:#6998224}

Please leave any comments here within the next four days.
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