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Speed of Ram

Posted on 2002-05-10
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Last Modified: 2013-11-10
Right now I have 128megs of SDram and I plan to get 256 more of Sdram.  However, I do not know what speed of ram to get.  Is there a way to find out what speed the ram is right now in the computer?  Is it best to find matching ram speeds when upgrading?
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Question by:roca
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by:sorgie
ID: 7002719
do you have a manual for your computer??

mostly if your Sdram is 168 pin then most likely it is standard 8 nanoseconds
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by:kiranghag
ID: 7002853
if u have a PII or PIII mobo, then u can add any PC100 SDRAM in the market. ask for that
it would be more better if u specify your motherboard model
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by:genguy
ID: 7002882
Good question. It is likely that the "speed" of ram you have (older) is cas 3. The new memory you buy these days will be cas 2.5 or cas 2 (newer). If you do not alter your motherboards memory timings, all will run fine.
CAS 2 mem will run slower at CAS 3 without any problems, but not the other way around. Very little, "real world" perfomance difference is realised from faster memory timings.
Get a good quality brand, here you will notice a difference, the evil blue screen will rear it's ugly head when low quality mem is used, no matter how fast it is.
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by:jlauster
ID: 7003005
Use the configurator at:

http://www.crucial.com/index.asp

If your system is listed, it will show what was installed originally, and what will be compatible with it.
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jhance earned 50 total points
ID: 7003011
Someone foolishly said:

>>>if u have a PII or PIII mobo, then u can add any PC100 SDRAM in the market. ask for that

That is VERY poor advice!!  It's possible that your system has a 133MHz memory bus and therefore needs PC133 memory.  If you buy PC100 memory it may fool you and work but it will likely be unreliable.

Check the specifications for your model of computer or motherboard and determine the CORRECT type.  If it's unclear, it would be FAR WISER to get PC133 which has no problem working in a slower 100MHz bus system.
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by:sorgie
ID: 7003068
oops did I read this wrong or what!!!!!
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by:jhance
ID: 7003082
sorgie,

You really can't find RAM rated in nS anymore.  The PC66/100/133/etc... terminology has become dominant.  Just try going to a retailer and asking for 7.5nS RAM.  

They'll have that glazed over "deer-in-the-headlights" look about them until they say "Nope, we ain't got any a dat dere kind a memory.  Try Radio Shack....."
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by:sorgie
ID: 7003230
I realized that an hour after I wrote it!!

guess I'll try Radio Shack!! LOL

regards
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by:roca
ID: 7003265
I don't know what model is my motherboard, and I don't have the system manual.  It is an Emachine though, with a 400mhz Celeron processor.  I doubt it is has a 133mhz bus speed, but I could be wrong.  So if I get PC133 SDram, it will work fine even though the bus speed of the computer is probably slower anyways?
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by:jhance
ID: 7003279
A 400MHz Celeron is a PC100 machine.  You can use EITHER PC100 or PC133 SDRAM.

PC133 will work fine, and in fact that may be all you find at a store.  PC100 is really hard to find these days since PC133 is much more common.
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by:jlauster
ID: 7003650
Your system should be listed in the configurator at Crucial. There are several 400 series systems listed. Your model number is probably on the face of the case or on a sticker somewhere on the case.
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by:pjknibbs
ID: 7005592
jhance: The 400MHz Celeron was actually 66MHz, because Intel were trying to keep clear blue water between it and the 100MHz FSB of the Pentium II/III--it's only recently Intel have released Celerons with 100MHz FSB, and that's purely because you can't get PIIIs with that FSB anymore.
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by:roca
ID: 7007192
Thanks a lot.
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