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Right-justifying an icon in JToolBar

Posted on 2002-05-16
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Last Modified: 2008-02-26
I'd like to create a toolbar that contains a Help icon justified to the far right (or bottom, if vertically aligned).  Unfortunately, it doesn't look like I'm able to specify layouts in JToolBar.  I have thought about putting the whole JToolBar in a JPanel, and then adding the Help icon to the East of the JPanel, but then I lose the special relationship a JToolBar has with a JFrame (such as the ability to detach or be relocated around the frame).

How can I right-justify an icon in a JToolBar?

Thanks in advance for any help!
Dave
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Question by:dmkoelle
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6 Comments
 
LVL 16

Assisted Solution

by:heyhey_
heyhey_ earned 400 total points
ID: 7015625
try adding invisible component with very big preferred width just before the Help icon.
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:tomboshell
ID: 7015667
I have not tried changing the Layout of the componenet, but I do use the add method from the Component class.  Located there is also the setLayout method.  You should be able to set the component's layout routine in a similar method as a frame.  This may be an oversimplification but still the capability is there and therefore should be possible.  Try applying a layout manager directly to the toolbar and add the components in such a manner.

I know that this works....
public JToolBar getToolBar(){
          JToolBar jtbar=new JToolBar("Standard");
          GridLayout gl=new GridLayout(2,2);;
          jtbar.setLayout(gl);
          jtbar.add(dateSearchAction);
          jtbar.add(nameSearchAction);
          jtbar.add(symptomSearchAction);

          jtbar.add(advanceSearchAction);

          jtbar.add(exitAction);
          return jtbar;
     }

So, you should just have to play around with the layout managers until you have the desired appearance that you want.

tom
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LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
tomboshell earned 400 total points
ID: 7015678
whoops...that GridLayout should be (3,2);

I wipped that up after stating that I didn't try something, I have tried it now and it did work for me.  If you can do a grid you also do other things.  The only limit I saw was in the toolBar's actual size rendering.  The size is determined by the number of components and their preferred sizes.  But then you could always have fun and add a JToolBar to a JToolBar with layouts and all specified.  That would start to develop more complex looks.

enjoy,
tom
0
 

Author Comment

by:dmkoelle
ID: 7021738
I found both comments helpful.  My actual solution was to do something similar to heyhey's suggestion, although I found that the preferred size didn't need to have a large dimension (I tried Integer.MAX_VALUE and my program froze).  Dimension(1,0) works just fine.

The code below right-justifies an icon on a horizontal toolbar, and bottom-justifies an icon on vertical toolbar.


toolbar.add(left-justified-button-1)
toolbar.add(left-justified-button-2)
toolBar.add(new JComponent() {
    public Dimension getPreferredSize()
    {
        return new Dimension(1,0);
    }
});
toolBar.add(right-justified-button);
0
 
LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:girionis
ID: 8766575
No comment has been added lately, so it's time to clean up this TA.

I will leave a recommendation in the Cleanup topic area that this question is:

- split points between heyhey_ and tomboshell

Please leave any comments here within the
next seven days.

PLEASE DO NOT ACCEPT THIS COMMENT AS AN ANSWER !

girionis
Cleanup Volunteer
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