I want to initialize a member of a class when its parent is initialized

//
//  I want a class One to contain an instance of class Two and pass a variable to
//  that instance of class Two upon initialization.  
//
//  In other words, when I initialize AclassOneVar, it should create and initialize aaa
//  which is a class Two variable.
//
//  What is wrong with this code?
//
//  Thanks,
//     Ken


#include <iostream>

class Two {
 
public:
  Two(int b );  
  inline int ShowB() { return b_; } ;

private:
  int b_ ;

} ;

class One {
 
public:
  One(int a );
  ~One();
  inline int ShowA() { return a_; } ;
  inline Two *ShowAAA() { return aaa; } ;
  inline int ShowAAA_B() { return aaa->ShowB() ; } ;

private:
  int a_ ;
  Two *aaa ;

} ;

Two::Two(int b ): b_(b) {
}

One::One(int a ) {
  a_ = a ;
  Two *aaa = new Two( a_+100 ) ;
}

One::~One() {
  //  delete aaa;                                   //  Seg faults if left uncommented
}

main() {

  Two AclassTwoVar(3);

  One AclassOneVar(13);
  Two *aa = new Two(19) ;

  cout << AclassTwoVar.ShowB() << endl ;             //  prints out 3 as expected
  cout << aa->ShowB() << endl ;                      //  prints out 19 as expected
  cout << AclassOneVar.ShowAAA_B() << endl ;         // prints out garbage should print 113
  cout << AclassOneVar.ShowAAA()->ShowB() << endl ;  // prints out garbage should print 113

  delete aa ;
}

klopterAsked:
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GGRUNDYConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You don't need pointers & stars.
Be sure that a_ is declared before aaa in class One.
(the order in which you declare the members is important).

class One {
 
public:
 One(int a );
 ~One();
 inline int ShowA() { return a_; } ;
 inline Two& ShowAAA() { return aaa; } ;
 inline int ShowAAA_B() { return aaa.ShowB() ; } ;

private:
 int a_ ;
 Two aaa ;

} ;

// ************************************
// then you just construct class One as below

One::One(int a ):a_(a),aaa(a_+100)
{
}
0
 
klopterAuthor Commented:
My mistake.  In the One::One() initialiation, there is a
"Two *" which does not belong.  When I take that out I get
the behaviour I want.


I will this question up to see if anyone has a better solution.  ie. One that does not involve pointers and
new().

Thanks,
  Ken
0
 
klopterAuthor Commented:
You get 150 points for an ampersand :)

That is exactly what I wanted, but I never put in that ampersand in   "inline Two& ".

I only went to the pointer scheme because I couldn't make this work.

Thanks,
  Ken
0
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