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User rights in Win2K PRO

Posted on 2002-05-19
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I've gone through and set up all my users and their rights and policies, but I was wondering. . .

How do I set it up so that users that are NOT administrators cannot access files or folders that I choose?  Example, I have a user account named gamers, used specifically for people who want to play Quake 3, Jedi Knight, Counterstrike, ect...  but I don't want them to browse all my files or access my Outlook Express POP3.  I've looked everywhere for the settings but just can't find them.  
Thanks in advanced.
Kenny
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Question by:DrPcKen
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jmiller47 earned 150 total points
ID: 7019994
You need to use NTFS permissions.

Step #1: To check to see if you are already using NTFS permissions, double-click on my computer and right click and choose properties of C: (or whatever drive you want NTFS on. This example will be for the C: drive.) On the General tab, you should see File System: and then NTFS, FAT16, or FAT32. If your drive is already NTFS, then skip to step #3.

Step #2: Convert your C:Drive to NTFS. NTFS (New Technology File System) is a way of formatting a hard drive that increases it' speed (access time), and it's data security by using NTFS Security. The only drawback is that it cannot be accessed from Win9x or DOS Operating Systems. If you dual boot, you should probably not convert to NTFS. To convert: Go to Start > Run > type: "cmd" and click ok. A command prompt will appear and you should type the following: "CONVERT C: /FS:NTFS". The computer will answer back that the drive cannot be converted while in use and will attempt the conversion during a reboot. Accept this and reboot. During the reboot, you will see the progress of the converion of your hard ddrive. Note: This is not a destructive process and you will lose no data.

Step #3: Set Permissions: Open Windows Explorer and right click the directories or files you want to protect. Click on the Security tab. This is where you will designate who has Full control, Change, Read, or No Access. Set who can do what and you're done!.

Let us know if you have any firther questions.

Thanks
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by:DrPcKen
ID: 7020031
Excellent answer,

Right now I'm running Fat32, but I think I will convert.  What are the drawbacks for switching to NTFS??  Will all the software and apps i use still run under NTFS??  

I don't plan on ever going back to 98 or DOS anyway, so there is a big possibility I will convert.
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7020054
You will have no problems whatsoever. There really is no change except that disk access is a SMALL amount faster and now you will have the ability to do file and directory security.
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by:jmiller47
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The ONLY drawback is you will not be able to run several Operating systems on the same machine easily...
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by:jmiller47
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The ONLY drawback is you will not be able to run several Operating systems on the same machine easily...
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 7020185
There is one other draw back. Even though NTFS is more fault tolerant and usually less likely for files or folders getting corrupted or messed up if this does happen NTFS is harder to do manual fixes and repairs. With FAT32 you have a backdoor so to speak by using a Win98 boot disk to move and/or copy files and folders. In short FAT32 is a lot easier to fix and repair then NTFS but NTFS is less likely to break. Personally I stick with FAT32 except in situation where I need the extra security that NTFS provides. Also I have yet to really see any noticeable performance gain using NTFS but have noticed that NTFS does use less disk space.

If you do decide to convert do yourself a favor and backup all your important files first. The conversion itself usually doesn't cause any problems but the potential is there for something to go wrong and loose everything. I know because it has happened to me at least twice. In one instance the power went out in the building right in the middle of the conversion and the other instance I have no clue of what happened. I rebooted after the conversion and poof nothing was there. No OS no file system, just a big nothing. So take the time to backup at the very least that which is important to you but ideally backup the entire disk or partition you are going to convert.


The Crazy One
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by:jmiller47
ID: 7020207
Good points! In FAT, FAT32, you can boot to a DOS diskette and work with files. In an NTFS environment, you cannot work with those files when booting to a DOS diskette without a third-party software. This is because of the added security which NTFS brings.

To secure your files in the Operating System, you lose out on the ability to boot to a DOS diskette and manipulate files without a third-party software (that can also be loaded from a diskette). However, you can still boot from the Windows 2000 CDROM and use the recovery console to directly manipulate files for repairing problems.

As far as backing up your hard drive, that is definitely a good idea whether you convert your drive to NTFS or not. If you have the change to purchase Symantec Ghost, you can back up your drive to CDROMs, or a spare cheap hard drive that you can place in your system.

Otherwise, a tape backup will suffice but I have found them to be very costly. (I wish I could find a cost effective solution myself...)
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by:CrazyOne
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>>>As far as backing up your hard drive, that is definitely a good idea whether you convert your drive to NTFS or not.

Good advice indeed. :>)
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by:DrPcKen
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Thanks so much.

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by:jmiller47
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One last point -

The third-party software I spoke of earlier is called NTFSDOS if you are interested. I provided a link below. A freeware version is available that you can load from DOS to READ-ONLY your NTFS drive. A Professional version is available for a small fee that allows you to work freely with all files on a NTFS drive.

http://www.sysinternals.com/ntw2k/utilities.shtml
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