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Question on SYSADM

Posted on 2002-05-20
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I have read that when a user (Administrator on Windows 2000) installs DB2, any user account that belongs to the Adminstrators group in the system will have SYSADM authority on the default DB2 instance. I checked my DB2 server and found that the SYSADM_GROUP was not assigned to any group. Why isn't it assigned to the Administrators group after the installation? If SYSADM_GROUP is not assigned, that means nobody has SYSADM authority. How can this be?
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Question by:yongsing
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ghp7000 earned 50 total points
ID: 7033287
The user name you used to install DB2, typically db2admin, is the owner of the service that DB2 needs in order to run under Win2000. The user name you used to install must be in the admin group under Windows, otherwise an error is returned during installation.
After install is complete, you can control the authority level of all the users by assigning a name to the SYSADM_GROUP with command line command:
db2 update dbm cfg using SYSADM_GROUP (group_name)
then
db2stop
db2start
Now, only users in (group_name) have sysadm authority, if you don't do this, all users have in Win2000 administrator group have sysadm authority on the INSTANCE and the databases running under that instance.
In fact, the default setup of DB2 is that all users in windows admin group get sysadm authority unless you change it.
Regards
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by:yongsing
ID: 7033646
>> In fact, the default setup of DB2 is that all users in
>> windows admin group get sysadm authority unless
>> you change it.

But the SYSADM_GROUP is initially not assigned to any group (as can be seen with "get dbm cfg"), so how can all users in the windows admin group get this authority?

If the SYSADM_GROUP is not assigned initially, then nobody is SYSADM, isn't it? How can this be?
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