• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 331
  • Last Modified:

Internal DNS server Setup

Hello,

I am running a Win2K server and would like to setup a internal DNS server. I have ten subnets. They range from
10.16.130.X to 10.16.139.X. Each department is on thier own subnet. All the departments are in the same building.
I am having a little trouble deciding on on how to set the DNS server up. Actually, I need a little example of how to set this up correctly, if possible please give a example. However, any help at all would be appreciated.

Ok, let me clarify. Yes, I do understand DNS. Yes, it is quite simple. One more comment, Just give me ideas Ok, not personal comments. Isn't that what this site is about?

See, I don't want to just add a bunch of PC and server names in a DNS server w/o grouping them logically. Just like tech.domain.local, executives.domain.local. I am mostly familiar with setting up external DNS stuff with one or two domains. NO, I'm not itegrating everything with Active directory. I just wat to setup a simple internal DNS server that will provide name resolution for all my servers Novell and NT as well as all my workstations. I know subnets have nothing to do with DNS, sorry about that one. What I meant was, how many departments I had and thier subnets. I wanted some ideas on how to logically put them into groups.
0
haasjoh
Asked:
haasjoh
3 Solutions
 
scraig84Commented:
Hmm.  No offense meant, but are you sure you want to do this yourself?  Considering you gave no information on domain names or what this DNS server will do for you, and instead gave IP subnet information which is inconsequential, you don't seem to have a very good grasp on what a DNS server does.  Like I said, I mean no offense, and instead don't want to see you get in over your head.  I would suggest that before asking any more how-to's you do a bit of homework on DNS and how DNS servers function etc.

 
0
 
andyalderCommented:
I'd be tempted to use a subdomain for each department, something like accounts.domain.local, technical.domain.local etc. Don't use your own Internet domain name internally which is why I've used .local rather than .com as the top level domain in the example.

So the machines would be server1.accounts.mdomain.local, PC4.technical.domain.local etc.

But this would be for a big firm over 500 users where you intend to have 10 active directory domains; if there are only 10 people in each department then a single layer like mydomain.local and name the machines accsvr1.domain.local, tecpc1.domain.local etc. (where acc=accounts, tec=technical) is less messing about.

You could go to town like Microsoft have, e.g. inet-imc-02.redmond.corp.microsoft.com is the internal FQDN for their public mailserver maila.microsoft.com server.

Since you probably have Internet access the server will probably be used to resolve names for the clients browsing the web so setup your ISP's DNS resolvers as forwarders, you could use the root hints instead of forwarders but you might as well use your ISP's server since it'll respond faster than the root servers which often are too busy and time out.

If you want to host your public DNS records then either use a seperate server than your internal DNS server or something that can support two seperate sets of DNS records but I'm lazy and normally let the ISP do the public records.




0
 
NenadicCommented:
Do you plan on having a DNS structure separate from Active Directory?
- If not - you needn't make any decisions, the DNS structure will mirror the Active Directory structure and be replicated together with domain information.
- If you want them separate - what is the reason?  If there is a valid reason, you should still mirror Active Directory as much as possible to avoid confusion.

With ten /24 subnets, you can have a maximum of 2,540 computers. With that number, a flat domain structure for both AD and DNS makes most sense.
You can subdivide the network from AD, by using Organizational Units.

If you decide to go for multiple levels of DNS structure - how many zones and name servers will you implement?
There should be a primary and at least one secondary name server for each zone.

My advice - stick to integrated Active Directory zone. It reduces the amount of admin work for you.

Cheers,
Nenadic
0
 
CleanupPingCommented:
haasjoh:
This old question needs to be finalized -- accept an answer, split points, or get a refund.  For information on your options, please click here-> http:/help/closing.jsp#1 
EXPERTS:
Post your closing recommendations!  No comment means you don't care.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now