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AMD: What am I buying?

Posted on 2002-05-28
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
Ok, I need a new computer and I decided on a AMD 1800+.  From what i've read, it is equivalent to a Intel 2Ghz machine but then i've also read that it can't be compared because the amount of work per cycle is different.  So, can anyone tell me in plain english.  What the heck am I planning on buying?

Why should I choose an AMD over an Intel?
Thanks,
myuen
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Question by:myuen
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tmj883 earned 50 total points
ID: 7040579
Plain English...the AMD1800+ actually runs at 1530MHz but  the AMD processor is able to perform 9 operations per clock cycle compared to Intel's P4 which is able to perform only 6 operations per clock cycle. AMD feels that giving a "performance rating" (ie, 1800+) designation to their processors is more marketable to consumers. In other words the AMD 1800+(1530MHz) will perform as many operations as an Intel P4(1800MHz) per clock cycle. To me, this is a blunder by AMD. It is confusing. None the less, benchmarks support AMD's assertion.
You should choose AMD because they are more cost efficient, and Intel is overated/overpriced. I see no performance advantage in cpus with the same number of operation per clock cycle. This is where it gets down to the price...keep in mind...price per operations per clock cycle...and do the math...T
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by:tmj883
ID: 7040589
P.S.
Memory Bandwidth also has an effect of cpu performance with RambusDRAM holding the edge, but in actual performance that is benchmarked, this advantage over DDR is small.T
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by:centerv
ID: 7040681
An amd 1800 with ddr ram AND at least ata 100-7200 rpm hard
drives with a 64 meg ddr graphics card will give you excellent fast
performance at a reasonable price to run anything on the market that you may encounter for some time to come.
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by:Crash2100
ID: 7040752
my last three computers have been amd, and I have had great success with all of them.  I would highly recommend amd over intel.  Best of all, amd's are cheaper and the motherboards tend to have more features.

Athlon XP Has The Lead Over Pentium 4
http://www6.tomshardware.com/cpu/01q4/011031/xpvsp4-15.html
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by:Smokintbird
ID: 7040839
good awnser "tmj883" !!

I'm impresed, it's rare to find someone who'll put any thouhgt into a comment these days.  I learned something I didn't know, and you have my vote for the expert points.

BTW, IMNSHO, AMD is the all around best processor on the market.  There's no way I'd buy an intel, their performance for my tasks just doesn't compare to that of an identical AMD.
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by:tmj883
ID: 7040947
I would agree with the other experts that an AthlonXP cpu, DDR333, ATA133, USB2.0, maybe IDE RAID, and a good DDR video card would make the basis of a great system for some time to come(how long?). This type of system can be built much cheaper than a comparable Intel and as Crash2100 pointed out, more features(overclocking/monitoring). T
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by:pjknibbs
ID: 7041100
I'll add my voice to the AMD crowd. Just to give a trivial example, the SETI@Home client takes around 7-8 hours to process a workunit on a 1.6GHz P4, whereas my 1.2GHz Athlon can do the same thing in 6 hours. What sort of performance you get does depend what applications you run--either an Athlon or a P4 will run office applications beautifully, but then, so would an old Pentium 200, so that's maybe not meaningful!
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by:malfisher
ID: 7041153
I would just like to add that if you do go AMD (my last 4 PC's have been AMD) be sure to get some good cooling. The last one I built around a Duron 800, has been very good, but needed additional cooling in the case to run cool. But I believe that is because I opted for a cheap heatsink/fan on the CPU. Otherwise I agree, the price difference between the Intel and AMD products seems hard to justify.
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by:myuen
ID: 7042207
Thanks tmj883!

You said the magic words I was looking for.
Of to buy an AMD I go.
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by:tmj883
ID: 7043224
Good luck with your new system, my Thunderbird is an awesome performer with stability to match, hope yours turns out the same. T
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