System hangs with new CPU

I have an odd little brand new computer. It came with a pentium 166 socket 7 cpu (which runs at 133 but I can't figure out the jumper settings to correct this). I upgraded to a k2-450 (which runs at 400) and now, I'm running windows 2000, and it just about gets to the ctl-atl-delete screen and then it hangs.
It's a safari premium computer. I'll be damned if I can figure out the make of the motherboard but it has SiS 530 chips on it.

My first guess is that the cpu is wonky but if that was true wouldn't it not boot at all. Also the 450 is not overheating. After it crashes I can take the fan and heatsink off and the 450 is cool enough to touch so I don't think it's a heat problem.

Thanks for your help,

Jon
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jonleehackerAsked:
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rayt333Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Same fan and heatsink?

How did you set jumpers for the 450 CPU if you do not know how to change them from 133 to 166?

We really need to know what MB you are working with to be able to help you.

My first thought is to ask is the 166 mmx compatable? the reason I ask this is I thought the 166 was single voltage CPU's and only the later CPU's that were mmx compatable had the dual voltage that all the later CPU's requires which includes the 450 CPU.

The pin layout were the same so you can put a later CPU on the early MB but you would fry it pretty fast since the voltage would be too high.
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jonleehackerAuthor Commented:
I should add that the system boots fine with the pentium 166 cpu installed
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1175089Commented:
Try to boot in safe mode (with F8), may be this problem i driver related (video , HDD controller, system chipset) or BIOS related. (Win2k wants and works with full ASPI BIOS support).
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jhanceCommented:
There were many Pentium motherboards that were not 100% compatible with AMD K6 CPUs.  This could likely be one of them.  Generally the problems run deeper than just BIOS level (i.e. software) incompatibities but rather were hardware design issues that just didn't take into account the (albeit slight, but still important) differences between the Intel Pentium hardware requirements and the AMD K6 hardware requirements.

Bottom line in my opinion is that you're likely to spend a lot of your time messing with this with little long term possibility of success.

But one place to start looking would be the motherboard manufacturer's support information to see if the AMD K6 was supported for your model of motherboard.
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GothmogCommented:
jonleehacker check on your motherboard between your pci slots there will be letters that will be the name of the m/b then i suggest you search on the net in google or somewhere about bugs found in that m/b i also think it must be that your m/b cant support your cpu but i am certain that somewhere there they will say if your motherboard has a problem with AMD cpu's also go to the motherboards site if you can get the url and check there if they say anything. Also make sure you bought a socket 7 cpu not a socket A although a socket A probaly wouldnt fit ona socket 7 m/b i dont know never thought of checking but anyways hope this helps.
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rayt333Commented:
You say the system will boot up with the 166 CPU in it, ok on the screen where you see the memory count, there should be a string of letters and numbers, copy that down and post it here and we may be able to help you find the make and model of the MB.
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magarityCommented:
I don't remember the voltages involved.  Does anyone know the K6-2 versus Pentium 1?  I suspect the Pentium 1 uses a little bit LESS power, which would explain why it works until the load gets too heavy.
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jonleehackerAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the responses. I think I've gotten it mostly figured out. On the mb I found the jumpers for the cpu clock speed settings and when I moved the jumpers to a different setting (any different one) it worked fine.

An interesting note that there are 7 possible settings. Of the 7, 1 won't boot at all, the other 6 all run the (450) cpu at 400 or less (down to 133). Even stranger is they seem almost random. For example if I put it at the 5x settings it runs at 133, if I put it at 3x it runs at 266. Bizarre.
But I did find one that runs at 400 and works well so I think I'll live with that.

I'll give rayt333 the points because it's his comment:

 How did you set jumpers for the 450 CPU if you do not know how to change them from 133 to 166?

that made me realize that the jumpers could be the problem.
to answer the question I thought it would at least work whether I changed the jumpers or not - I figured it was the bios that picked up the 'normal' cpu settings.

Here's the computer if you're curios: http://www.tekvisions.com/Products_%20Book%20Sized%20PC's_The%20Safari.htm

Any further comments are welcome,

Jon
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jonleehackerAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the responses. I think I've gotten it mostly figured out. On the mb I found the jumpers for the cpu clock speed settings and when I moved the jumpers to a different setting (any different one) it worked fine.

An interesting note that there are 7 possible settings. Of the 7, 1 won't boot at all, the other 6 all run the (450) cpu at 400 or less (down to 133). Even stranger is they seem almost random. For example if I put it at the 5x settings it runs at 133, if I put it at 3x it runs at 266. Bizarre.
But I did find one that runs at 400 and works well so I think I'll live with that.

I'll give rayt333 the points because it's his comment:

 How did you set jumpers for the 450 CPU if you do not know how to change them from 133 to 166?

that made me realize that the jumpers could be the problem.
to answer the question I thought it would at least work whether I changed the jumpers or not - I figured it was the bios that picked up the 'normal' cpu settings.

Here's the computer if you're curios: http://www.tekvisions.com/Products_%20Book%20Sized%20PC's_The%20Safari.htm

Any further comments are welcome,

Jon
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ridCommented:
Don't overlook the comment from rayt333 about BIOS ID. If you can figure out BIOS maker and catch the ID string, you may have better chances of finding out mobo maker/type.

Regards
/RID
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rayt333Commented:
You really need to look in the manual to see the proper jumper settings, some MB has the mulitipling jumpers and also jumpers for the bus speed (50, 60, 66, 75, 100), you would use the mulitipling jumper times the bus speed (450= 4.5 X 100 or 6 X 75 or even 7.5 X 60) note: you usally want the bus speed det as high as possible, at least as far as the MB/CPU supports)
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jonleehackerAuthor Commented:
Here's the id string:
62-1029-000000-00101111-071595-SiS530-1SIS5300-H

the bios is American MegaTrends AMIBIOS(C) 1999  TC602
dated:  07/20/2000

I'll take a look for the bus speed jumpers

thanks,

Jon
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jonleehackerAuthor Commented:
Thanks rayt333,

I found the bus speed jumpers so now my 450 is running at 450!!!

Great help. Much appreciated.

JOn
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