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Granny wants to .....(home networking)

Posted on 2002-05-31
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
I have DSL now, a hub fixed up with my old win nt 4. networked in. [This is so fun!!] Win nt is so full it is spewing all over the livingroom & I can't uninstall anything cause the log files are missing so it says; "Not one more thin waffer...!".  Want to "clean install" it's original stuff to the hard drive, and start it anew;(Oh, the E:\ drive on the NT has TONS of room, like a stadium I use for storage and anything.)  Need to know if I can copy the C:\ drive with all that is on it as it is now through my network [hub] to the CD/RW drive on my other new Dell D 4400 / Win xp sitting next to it?  That way I won't loose anything (?), Possible to do, Guys?  Need your help...Granny!
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Question by:BJYeager
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Bit_Twiddler earned 500 total points
ID: 7048226
Yes you can. The problem however is if you do a straight copy the contents of your c: drive are probably larger than what a CD will hold. You need to be able to span across several CDs.

While it is possible to use Microsoft's Backup utility it does not know how to span CD-RWs, so if you're using this form of storage, you're limited to 650MB. The program will give each disk the same job name, so be sure to physically label the set clearly ("disk 2 of 5," and so on)if you go this route.

A better tool would be Powerquest's Drive Image (http://www.powerquest.com/driveimage/index.cfm) which will do a full or partial back up and restore from any device on a network and will span across volumes (CDR/CDRW Zip disk etc.)
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by:BJYeager
ID: 7048261
OK, now, this is my cont. Q; the RW is on the new pc, and I need to transfer the c;\ drive from the old one to the new one over my network to the new pc where the CD RW drive is???  Can I?  Thanks
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by:ITsheresomewhere
ID: 7048331
A couple Q's to your Q.

When you say "not one thin wafer more"  just how much free space is available, if any, on C:.  How big is C: in total?

Which drive have you been loading your applications software (programs) to and how much space does it have.

If drive D is not included in the above what is it being used for and how much free space does it have?

 
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by:Bit_Twiddler
ID: 7048537
BJYeager

Re:

OK, now, this is my cont. Q; the RW is on the new pc, and I need to transfer the c;\ drive from the
old one to the new one over my network to the new pc where the CD RW drive is???  Can I?  Thanks
=================================

The answer as in my previuos comment, assuming the CDRW is a "shared" device on the network, is yes.

I was just noting that you cannot just do a straight drag and drop copy in Windows as the "copy" command does not span files across volumes. You would have to make sure the files being copied are small enough to fit on a CD. While this could be done for several CD's worth, you would have to meticulouly replace all the flies back where they belonged.

Windows "Backup" utility would to the task but it does not name each volume created with a separate name so you would have to make sure you hand labeled each CD created with a separate label (i.e. cd1, cd2, cd3, etc.)You would also have to check The "Back up Windows Registry" check box on the Advanced Tab under Options in order to copy your registry files if you wanted them as well. (see http://www.uct.ac.za/depts/its/itcorner/backup/)

Tools like Drive Image let you make a verbatim image of a drive if desired (you can use it for partial backups as well) and easily span volumes, backup to networked devices and so forth. I am not sure if the latest verion lets you install on one machine and backup the other machines volumes so you may have to install it on the PC being backed up and since you mentioned that your NT box was maxed out then this might be an issue since you would not have enough room to install it. However You could mnove some data across the network to the other PC to free up enough room to install. See (http://www.powerquest.com/driveimage/index.cfm)

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by:Bit_Twiddler
ID: 7048555
BJYeager:

Just for curiousity using 2 Win 98 PCs networked I ran Windows backup from pc2 and backed up files (a directory in this case) from pc1 across the network  to the CDRW on pc2. I was then able to restore the files again across the network onto pc1. I was also able to take the crdw put it in the the cdwr drive on pc1 and restore the files back on pc1 as well.

If the same holds true for Drive Image then you could do similar with it.

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by:lrmoore
ID: 7048643
I just want to throw a few cautions out.
Just because you copy (or backup/restore) your drive contents, your applications won't run.
When you do a clean install, you have to re-install every application that you have running. That's because all the setup routines fill up the system registry with settings, file locations, etc. Simply moving the files back won't put all the registry settings back.
All you really need to backup are your DATA files, those files that you have created yourself. I assume most of those are on the E:\ drive.
My advice: simply comb through your C: drive and move all of your data files that you want to keep over to the E: drive putting them all into easily remembered folders to get them organized. Then simply reformat the C: drive and start your NT all over again. This could be a tedious process because NT does not use Plug and Play so you must first write down which video driver you're using, which network card driver you're using, which sound card driver you're using, etc so that you can re-install all the right drivers (these don't get automatically updated either just by copying the drive contents over).

The bottom line is that if C: isn't big enough, too corrupt to fix, then simply backing up/restoring is going to renew the problems without fixing anything.
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by:SysExpert
ID: 7048683
Other options:
1) Move the swap drive, and temp directories to e:

2) Get Parition Magic 6 or 7, and use it to repartition your drive without losing any data. A full backup is recommended in any case.

3) Get Norton Ghost, and backup your C: drive to an image file on E:, and then you can transfer the image file to your win98 machine and burn it on CD's.
Then wipe C:, and reinstall NT from scratch.

I hope this helps !

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Author Comment

by:BJYeager
ID: 7048696
Now, this is wonderful.  One more thing,  how do I give all 3 of you points on Expert.  All suggestions are good and who knows I may need you all again?
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by:BJYeager
ID: 7048704
Oh, c;\ has total 1.8 GB of space,  101MB of space available.  I learned by myself on this, moved files to E for years and left some stuff on the c;\.  So there are reminents of junk on the c:\ and I can't uninstall.
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by:SysExpert
ID: 7048884
1.8 GB should be fine for the OS. 101 MB is not good, you should have at least 10-15% free space.
Uninstall old programs and move them to E:, clean up the temp filders, set IE to clean up all temp folders, and look into window washer or other free utilities that clean up files.

Also
http://www.pcmag.com/article/0,,s%3D1478%26a%3D9518,00.asp
http://www.pcmag.com/article/0,,s%3D1478%26a%3D6649,00.asp


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     I hope this helps !
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Author Comment

by:BJYeager
ID: 7050004
OK, guys...XP won't network with Win NT!!!
I give up,  it is now a mess.  Got to get away from it for a day or two before I get crazy; if there are any suggestions....e-mail to bjjarrett@hcsmail.com.  
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Expert Comment

by:stevenlewis
ID: 7052955
XP won't network with Win NT
It sure will, as long as the protocols, and such match
if using tcp/ip then the config info must be correct
this may help
http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/article04-108
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Expert Comment

by:stevenlewis
ID: 7052959
XP won't network with Win NT
It sure will, as long as the protocols, and such match
if using tcp/ip then the config info must be correct
this may help
http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/article04-108
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by:stevenlewis
ID: 7052961
Oh yeah, enable the guest accont on the NT box, and use simplified file sharing on the xp box, make sure they are in the same workgroup
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