Question for Axter (about basic_ios)

Axter,

Thank you for your explanation for my last question
http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qManageQuestion.jsp?qid=20308360

I want to know a little more:)

>According to the C++ standard, you're not allow to pass by value.

What is a C++ standard? Do I have that :-)

>private:
>basic_ios(const basic_ios& ); // not defined
>basic_ios& operator=(const basic_ios&); // not defined
>istream and istringstream both derive from basic_ios.  
>The standard defines basic_ios copy constructor
>and assignment operator as both private and not defined.

You mean 'private' shoul avoid basic_ios to be copied by me in compiling time?

And how do I know what belong to basic_ios ?
learnAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
AxterConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>>What is a C++ standard? Do I have that :-)
More then likely not.  It's not free, and it doesn't come with any of the major compilers.

You can get a draft copy free from the following link:
http://cs.calvin.edu/c++/C++Standard-Nov97/

You can purchase the C++ standard via the following link:
http://webstore.ansi.org/ansidocstore/product.asp?sku=ISO%2FIEC+14882%2D1998
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AxterCommented:
>>You mean 'private' shoul avoid basic_ios to be copied by
>>me in compiling time?

Yes.


>>And how do I know what belong to basic_ios ?
The C++ standard states that it's a decendent of basic_ios.
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nietodCommented:
>> What is a C++ standard? Do I have that :-)
The C++ standard is the set of rules that define the C++ language.  The define the sytax of the C++ language (i.e. ";" ends a statement, "::" is the scope resolution operator), how language constructs are to behave (i.e. what does a for loop do) how memory is to be organized (memory is stored by bytes of at least 8 bits.  Each byte must be large enough to store a character of the host's character set.  Each byte is stored at unique addresses....).   Amazingly about 1/2 of the standard does not deal with the Langauge proper, but with the STL library, which is really a library written in the C++ language, and not (in many ways) part of the language.

The standard was developed by a joint committee of ANSI (American National standards Institute) and ISO (International standards Organization (In English)).   If you are interested in its development I strongly suggest you read Bjarne Stroustrup's The Design and Evolution of C++.   It takes you form the Roots of C++ to nearly the end of its standarization.   Its entertaining reading and of some (not a lot) value to a programmer.
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learnAuthor Commented:
To nietod,

Thanks a lot for your interesting explanation :-)
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learnAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.
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