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.Net Self-Paced training (old dog-new tricks)

Posted on 2002-06-08
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Last Modified: 2010-05-02
Dear VB'ers

I have finally made the decision to shift to VB.Net, and realise the mindset change required.

I started with VB3 - and have some fairly complex applications in VB6. My goal is not specifically to port across to vb.Net, but more to develop a solif understanding so I can code from cold in the new paradigm.

I have the Osborne / Shapiro "Complete Reference to VB.Net", and it is a very solid 'reference', however I'm also looking for a good book /CD with worked examples of modest applications - explaining why particular references or objects were chosen.  

My specific question is - how can I become familiar with the 'standard' .Net classes and objects, and when is one more appropriate than another.   All the new 'required' declarations that I see inthe samples seem to come from nowhere!

Where are they explained - and how do I know what's available /or/ expected to be declared/instantiated by me in a program?

(Does that make sense?)

Some form of Self-Paced Training or an interactive DVD tutorial would be ideal.

Thanks in advance
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Question by:mcoop
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by:Joe_Griffith
ID: 7064492
All those declarations that seem to come from nowhere are probably coming from the .NET framework.  The best reference I've seen on the framework is "Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming" by Jefferey Richter.  It's not VB specific but then neither is the framework.

The most comprehensive reference for VB.NET I've found is "Mastering Visual Basic .NET" by Evangelos Petroutsos.

The best "getting started" book I've found is "Visual Basic .NET" by Richard Bowman.  It is not a beginning VB book but a guide to various VB.NET topics.  It consists of an extensive series of 'How to' topics usually limited to one or two pages each.  It's very good at getting you started on a given programming problem.  It also includes a CD with all of the sample projects although I can't really vouch for the CD as I have never actually looked at it.
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Expert Comment

by:Joe_Griffith
ID: 7064494
For what it is worth, Experts Exchange has now added a .NET topic.  For some reason they won't add it to the list of available topics, however, so you have to find it by accident.  You can get to it at http://www.experts-exchange.com/dot_net/
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Author Comment

by:mcoop
ID: 7064812
Thanks - I'll take a look...
(Let's see what else comes over the next couple of days - otherwise, I'll split the points to you both.)

Cheers
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rpai earned 50 total points
ID: 7067753
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by:mcoop
ID: 7068472
You both seem like nice people !
I'll post another 50 for you Joe.  Keep your eyes open!
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