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su - root : response: no shell

Posted on 2002-06-14
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I changed the sheel of root from /usr/sh to /usr/ksh. Which I think is not there. SO i am not able to log in as root.
How do i overcome this.
thanks
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Question by:anil27
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by:yuzh
ID: 7077617
Please check your /etc/passwd file

the default login shell for root is /sbin/sh, if you want to change it to ksh, it should use: /usr/bin/ksh

I suggest you change the shell for root back to /sbin/sh.
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Expert Comment

by:besky
ID: 7077624
You missed something, leaving it
as /sbin/usr/ksh is a common one.

Good news is, if you are running Solaris 9,
there is fallback shell if you stop the machine
and boot it into single user with boot -s
Bad news, it doesnt work in previous releases.

There you have to take your Solaris CD, put it in
boot with: boot cdrom -s
when its up do a mount:
mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /a
set TERM=vi
export TERM
vi /a/etc/shadow

remove everything between first and second colon
so it looks like this
root:: and leave the rest as it were

Have fun *L*

do an: umount /a
and reboot the system

Sorry, no other way to do it
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Accepted Solution

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yuzh earned 50 total points
ID: 7077710
boot up systems from CDROM as besky comment, change the passord file NOT shadow file, if your mount the root partition on /a, then:

vi /a/etc/passwd

BTW, ksh is located at /usr/bin NOT /sbin/usr/ksh


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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:besky
ID: 7077784
I have no problem with people correcting me when Im wrong but otherwise ...

The password was moved to the /etc/shadow file many many years ago.
The passwd filed in the /etc/passwd only holds an "x", leave it that way.

Trust me, every single Solaris training course
someone does this. TG for finally solved in S9.

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Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 7078238
What I mean is that to change the login shell need to edit the /etc/passwd file, the real "PASSOORD" is in /etc/shadow !

As anil27 wants to fix the login shell, NOT delete the passord that why I put my previous comment on.
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Expert Comment

by:besky
ID: 7078241
Right, sorry. My misstake.
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Author Comment

by:anil27
ID: 7082848
Thanks yuzh.I am using solaris 8. I was wondering what to change in /etc/shadow for shell.
The problem is solved after changing entries in /etc/passwd.
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