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Urgent help required to problems after Windows Update

Posted on 2002-06-16
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Have just installed the latest Microsoft update patch (Q318138) on my Sony Vaio laptop running XP professional. The download/install apparantly went smoothly. Upon trying to re-boot I get the following failure (blue screen) and the system endlessly loops attempting to re-boot. I have
tried safe mode etc with no joy whatever.

" STOP : c0000218  {Registry File failure }
the registry cannot load the Hive (file) :
\Systemroot\System32\Config\SAM
or its log or alternative
it is corrupt, absent, or not writable.

Beginning dump of physical memory........... "

Questions :

  - What is the missing file ?
  - How did it go missing ?
  - How do I recover (I have no 3.5 drive and no XP Professional Media CD ROM from which to boot)
  - Where can I get the XP Professional CD rom from? Would this help ?

I'm pretty certain of all the above facts. Please read fully before responding. Cheers.

All suggestion welcomed ?

Steve T



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Question by:steague
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please see here
http://support.microsoft.com/search/preview.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q318159
Damaged Registry Repair and Recovery in Windows XP (Q318159)

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The information in this article applies to:


Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional


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SYMPTOMS
When a registry hive becomes damaged, your computer may become unbootable, and you may receive one of the following Stop error messages on a blue screen:

Unexpected Shutdown


Stop:0xc0000135





CAUSE
Registry damage often occurs when programs with access to the registry do not cleanly remove temporary items that they store in the registry. This problem may also be caused if a program is terminated or experiences a user-mode fault.



RESOLUTION
NOTE : The hotfix that is described in this article automatically repairs the registry during startup, but does not display any notification of this process. If you import a damaged registry hive, you may receive a notification, and the recovery of the registry hive takes place as it imports.

A supported fix is now available from Microsoft, but it is only intended to correct the problem described in this article and should be applied only to systems experiencing this specific problem. This fix may receive additional testing at a later time, to further ensure product quality. Therefore, if you are not severely affected by this problem, Microsoft recommends that you wait for the next service pack that contains this fix.

To resolve this problem immediately, contact Microsoft Product Support Services to obtain the fix. For a complete list of Microsoft Product Support Services phone numbers and information about support costs, please go to the following address on the World Wide Web:


http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=fh;EN-US;CNTACTMS
NOTE : In special cases, charges that are normally incurred for support calls may be canceled, if a Microsoft Support Professional determines that a specific update will resolve your problem. Normal support costs will apply to additional support questions and issues that do not qualify for the specific update in question.

The English version of this fix should have the following file attributes or later:

   Date         Time   Version      Size       File name
   --------------------------------------------------------
   28-Feb-2002  10:13  5.1.2600.29  1,846,272  Ntkrnlmp.exe
   28-Feb-2002  10:14  5.1.2600.29  1,901,568  Ntkrnlpa.exe
   28-Feb-2002  10:14  5.1.2600.29  1,874,432  Ntkrpamp.exe
   28-Feb-2002  10:13  5.1.2600.29  1,879,168  Ntoskrnl.exe





STATUS
Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in the Microsoft products that are listed at the beginning of this article.

and here
http://support.microsoft.com/search/preview.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q307545
SUMMARY
This article describes how to recover a Windows XP system that does not start because of corruption in the registry. This procedure does not guarantee full recovery of the system to a previous state; however, you should be able to recover data when you use this procedure.

You can repair a corrupted registry in Windows XP. Corrupted registry files can cause a variety of different error messages. Please refer to the Knowledge Base for articles regarding error messages related to registry issues.

This article assumes that normal recovery methods have failed and access to the system is not available except by using Recovery Console. If an Automatic System Recovery (ASR) backup exists, it is the preferred method for recovery; it is recommended that you use the ASR backup before you try the procedure described in this article.

NOTE : Make sure to replace all 5 of the registry hives. If you only replace a single hive or two, this can cause potential issues, since software and hardware may have settings in multiple locations in the registry.



MORE INFORMATION
When you try to start or restart your Windows XP-based computer, you may receive one of the following error messages:

Windows XP could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM
Windows XP could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SOFTWARE
Stop: c0000218 {Registry File Failure} The registry cannot load the hive (file): \SystemRoot\System32\Config\SOFTWARE or its log or alternate
The procedure described in this article uses Recovery Console, System Restore, and lists all the required steps in specific order to ensure that the process completes fully. After you complete this procedure, the system should return to a state very close to the system before the problem occurred. If you have ever run NTBackup and completed a system state backup, you do not have to follow the procedures in parts two and three; you can skip to part four.
Part One
In part one, you boot to the Recovery Console, create a temporary folder, back up the existing registry files to a new location, delete the registry files at their existing location, and then copy the registry files from the repair folder to the System32\Config folder. When you are finished with this procedure, a registry is created that you can use to boot back into Windows XP. This registry was created and saved during the initial setup of Windows XP, so any changes and settings that took place after Setup completes are lost.

To complete part one, follow these steps:
Boot to the Recovery Console.


At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:


md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak

delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default

copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

NOTE : This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example). To create this file, run the following command when you boot into Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
The Batch command in Recovery Console allows for all the commands in a text file to be sequentially processed. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.
Part Two
To complete the procedure described in this section, you must be logged on as an administrator, or an administrative user (a user who has an account in the Administrators group). If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, you can log on as an administrative user. If you log on as an administrator, you must first start Windows XP Home Edition in Safe mode. To start the Windows XP Home Edition computer in Safe mode, follow these steps.

NOTE : Print these instructions before you continue. You will not be able to view these instructions after you shut down the computer in step 2.
Click Start , click Shut Down (or click Turn Off Computer ), click Restart , and then click OK (or click Restart ).


Press the F8 key.

On a computer that is configured to start to multiple operating systems, you can press F8 when you see the Startup menu.


Use the arrow keys to select the appropriate Safe mode option, and then press ENTER.


If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, use the arrow keys to select the installation that you want to access, and then press ENTER.


In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is normally not visible during normal usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:
Start Windows Explorer.


On the Tools menu, click Folder options .


Click the View tab.


Under Hidden files and folders , click to select Show hidden files and folders , and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.


Click Yes when the dialog box is displayed that confirms that you want to display these files.


Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to get a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.


Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder appears dimmed folder because it is set as a super-hidden folder.

NOTE : This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}".

NOTE: You may receive the following error message:
C:\System Volume Information is not accessible. Access is denied.
If you get this message, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to gain access to this folder and continue with the procedure:


Q309531 How to Gain Access to the System Volume Information Folder
Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with "RP x under this folder. These are restore points.


Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder folder; the following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:


C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot
From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:


_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file created by Setup, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUID under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. This is why it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.

The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You need a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.

The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to ensure the files are available under Recovery Console. You need to use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder by default.

NOTE : The procedure described in this section assumes that you are running your computer with the FAT32 file system.
Part Three
In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Boot to Recovery Console.


At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
del c:\windows\system32\config\sam

del c:\windows\system32\config\security

del c:\windows\system32\config\software

del c:\windows\system32\config\default

del c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_software c:\windows\system32\config\software

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_system c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_security c:\windows\system32\config\security

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_user_.default c:\windows\system32\config\default
NOTE : Some of the preceding command lines may be wrapped for readability.


NOTE : This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example).
Part Four
Click Start , and then click All Programs .


Click Accessories , and then click System Tools .


Click System Restore , and then click Restore to a previous Restore Point .





REFERENCES
For additional information about using Recovery Console, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q307654 HOW TO: Access the Recovery Console During Startup
Q216417 How to Install the Windows XP Recovery Console
Q240831 How to Copy Files from Recovery Console to Removable Media
Q314058 Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console
For additional information about System Restore, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Q306084 HOW TO: Restore Windows XP to a Previous State
Q261716 System Restore Removes Files During a Restore Procedure


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by:GUEEN
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You can also set your BIOS to boot from CD (press del key after memory run to get to BIOS and set boot order to CD- Rom first.) Then pop the CD in and run an install then select the 'repair' option.
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by:CrazyOne
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Umm Steve and Bev did you notice this

 - How do I recover (I have no 3.5 drive and no XP Professional Media CD ROM from which to boot)
 - Where can I get the XP Professional CD rom from? Would this help ?
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by:CrazyOne
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>>>- Where can I get the XP Professional CD rom from? Would this help ?

At just about any store that sells computers or online like at Amazon

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/104-7143811-5795125

How did XP get installed to begin with? When you boot the machine is there a menu of sorts to boot from and one of the items being a Recovery Console? If do select it and then do what Steves comment suggests but only on the SAM file. No need to this fix on the other files mentioned in that MS KB article.
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by:dew_associates
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Steve,

Reboot the system into safemode and then restore the system to a restore point prior to the update patch.

Dennis
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by:GUEEN
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To get into safe mode press the F8 key after the memory run to get the boot menu for menu selections.
Good thought Dew and Steven as always you have wonderful info.
I didn't see the lack of floppy or XP CD either - but I would suggest a USB external floppy drive and purchase Windows XP Pro from http://store.yahoo.com/freesoftware-shipping/win20prod.html (free shipping)
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by:CrazyOne
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Umm steague said

I have
tried safe mode etc with no joy whatever.

I am presuming that steague means the system won't boot into safemode and come to think of it if it won't boot into safemode it probably wouldn't boot to the recovery console either because a password is required and the SAM appears to be corrupted so it appears about the only way around this is to get an XP CD and do the repair method that shekerra mentioned. Unless it is FAT32 and steague  follows shekerra suggestion about getting an external floppy and boot the system using a Win98 boot disk www.bootdisk.com and use the copy or xcopy command from the prompt.  
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by:steague
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Hi Guys

Thanks for all the comments - including those pointing out 'missed' details of the problem.

If I can get something to boot - I can probably fix things. My laptop came with the XP O/S pre-installed. Hence my query about where to get distribution media.

Will Microsoft supply it free ? After all they have screwed my system ? I don't really want to spend a load of money buying something I already have !

In reply to the last comment, I don't have a 3.5" drive.

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by:CrazyOne
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>>>Will Microsoft supply it free ?

No unfortunately. :>(

>>>In reply to the last comment, I don't have a 3.5" drive.

Actually I was referring to shekerra's comment Date: 06/16/2002 08:58AM PST suggesting getting a USB external floppy drive to use. :>)    
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by:CrazyOne
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Do you have a friend that could lend you a copy of the XP CD. Not sure if that would even work or not because the CD's serial number would be different then the installations serial number. Dennis do you think useing anogher XP CD would allow a repair to be done? If it does and you can't find an XP CD to use you might consider taking the mahcine into a computer repair shop and see if they can fix the problem for you.
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by:GUEEN
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For a single-user case Legally each XP system should have an OS license and a unique registration code (Windows product activation =WPA code).  Borrowing a cd should not be a problem if you are stuck without a CD, but still have the XP product activation code (it might be on a sticker attached to the back of your computer when it was first shipped.) In that case it is legal to reinstall XP from a friend's retail CD and then enter your system's activation code.  The actual license is tied into the activation code and not to the physical media.  
Who did you initially purchase the computer from?  Is this a laptop?
 
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by:steague
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Hi Guys

Thanks for all the comments - including those pointing out 'missed' details of the problem.

If I can get something to boot - I can probably fix things. My laptop came with the XP O/S pre-installed. Hence my query about where to get distribution media.

Will Microsoft supply it free ? After all they have screwed my system ? I don't really want to spend a load of money buying something I already have !

In reply to the last comment, I don't have a 3.5" drive.

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by:CrazyOne
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>>>The actual license is tied into the activation code and not to the physical media.

Actaully I wasn't concerned about the activation code. I have had situations with Win2000 when doing a reinstall with a CD that wasn't the one used to for the original installation. Something to with none mathcing ProductID numbers. Maybe it was an OEM issue I just don't remember. :>)  
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by:CrazyOne
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Oops

this
Something to with none mathcing ProductID numbers.

Should read
Something to do with non mathcing ProductID numbers.
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by:GUEEN
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Well crazy have you tried the same situation with an XP installation?
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by:GUEEN
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I always hear about 2000 and we are in an XP Queue so I would like to keep it XP here as there are some differences.
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by:GUEEN
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If the OEM originally did not install your file system with NTFS and you have fat32 then you can use a win98 bootdisk (which means that you will need an external floppy drive) you can look for your product ID in C:\winnt\system32\$winnt.inf$.inf
Then borrow the CD (and cd-rom) to install with your original product ID.  I would most definately contact the manufacturer that you purchased from and demand that they provide a solution for this situation (still under warenty?) BTW who did you purchase this from?
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by:centerv
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You must have an I386 folder on the hard drive (setup files)

Make a boot cd from another pc and use it to access your drive to "repair" windows.
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by:steague
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Hi Guys

Trying to pull together all the information.

I guess I can beg steal or borrow a XP Pro CD (even if I have to bend Microsoft or Sonys arm a bit).

Assuming I can boot to this CD - do I then follow the instructions given by StephenLewis

{  http://support.microsoft.com/search/preview.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q318159
Damaged Registry Repair and Recovery in Windows XP (Q318159)    }

Beware patch Q318138  !!



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by:steague
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...also several guys have mentioned the recovery console. This option does not appear when I press F8.

How do I get this to run ?
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by:stevenlewis
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by:stevenlewis
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will it boot to safe mode (F8) if so try a system restore point
start-->programs-->accessories-->system tools-->system restore  and choose a date before this happened
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by:CrazyOne
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The Recovery Console may not be accessible because it requires a password for if to load. Unfortunately because the SAM is damage it is probably unlikely that it will get to the point where the password can entered. So your only option may be doing a repair.
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>>>I always hear about 2000 and we are in an XP Queue so I would like to keep it XP here as there are some differences.

Bev that was the reason for my question, to get some clarification. Not sure why the bothered you. :>)
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by:centerv
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If you're going to repair (reload) xp over itself, which I think is your best option, I would opt to do that from the files on the laptop as they are most likely customized by Sony for your laptop.
A generic version of xp or another's manufacturer's vrs may very likely cause you no further joy!
If you're not sure where the i386 folder is located, a call to Sony or a check of their website could tell you.
Good luck
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Highfive is so simple that setting up every meeting room takes just minutes and every employee will be able to start or join a call from any room with ease. Never be called into a meeting just to get it started again. This is how video conferencing should work!

 
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by:WiZaRd
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"I would most definately contact the manufacturer that you purchased from and demand that they provide a solution for this situation "
the "solution" here would likely be a full recovery. you did get a recovery CD didn't you (or is it on the hard drive partition)?
the manufacturer (as with Microsoft) can not be held responsible for software which you loaded (you did have a choice didn't you?).
you may find they'll help you as a customer service issue but I wouldn't be bending too many arms here as at the end of the day it was your decision to load the software.
don't wish to sound like I'm defending Sony or Microsoft but I can tell you from experience they are not legally bound to help you out here.
try the soft approach first.
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by:dew_associates
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Steve,

If the laptop is a Sony that you purchased with XP (any version) preinstalled on it, and the unit is not one sold to an enterprise and thus with an enterprise installation of XP, the license requires that a license sticker appear somehwere on your unit and that you be provided with the original installation files (unaltered) either on a separate internal drive OR via OEM Restore media OR on an original Microsoft CD. There are no "Legitimate" exceptions to this.

Hence, call the retailer and ask them for the media to fix your laptop!

Dennis
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by:steague
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Replying to the last comment.

Yes. Sony supply a recovery CD. Unfortunately this takes it back to the 'factory delivered' state. It allows no intervention whatever to get to a prompt or usable O/S. i.e. you can do this 'recover' and nothing else.

I would lose 3-4 weeks data + my Email and configuration. I would also have around 20 programs to re-install. This seems almost deliberately perverse, when it must be simple to allow re-boot from the supplied media.
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by:GUEEN
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I think in your situation I would try a repair with a friends CD - if that were to work get the files that you need to a removeable media (backup.) Then I would get my product ID from C:\winnt\system32\$winnt.inf$.inf and partition the drive (C D) and copy the i386 folder from the CD to drive D:\ (because generally when you install  XP via CD the cd-rom drive will default to D: for the installation - so the path to the source folder would be the i386 folder on D: after you remove the cd-rom drive.
Then when you get your next cd-rom drive just default the drive letter to E:  So that would make your installation always point toward the D: drive on your HDD and you would not have to mess with the OEM restore CD again...
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by:centerv
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>>>Yes. Sony supply a recovery CD

Yes, I thought you may have that situation, but restore cd generally put the setup files on the hard drive in which case you may already have the i386 folder on your drive.

If you can use a boot cd, you could explore your drive.
In any event, Sony may have run into this situation and be aware of the problem and may have a solution.
Worth a call.
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by:steague
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THE OUTCOME

Contacted Microsoft support who said that even if I could re-boot the machine there was no way to replace the damaged SAM file.

They advocated a complete clean rebuild, which I have just completed. Hey Ho.

Beware computers saying "Updates are available"  !!

Happy to hand over the 500 points to those who made helpful suggestions. Anyone know how to split the point up between a few folks ?
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by:steague
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BTW Sony support no help at all. They were reasonably informed and intelligent - just had nothing good to tll me !

Basically the only recovery option with a new Sony Vaio is to take it back to its original factory state (removing contents of C drive completely). Sony support at least had the decency to be shamefaced about telling me this was my only option.

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by:WiZaRd
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Does your laptop have a burner? Given you don't want a repeat of this situation it would be worth getting a burner or zip drive at least to back up your important stuff to in future. you'll still lose stuff you wrote since last backup but at least you won't lose all of it.

copy of document borrowed from another expert here:

HOW TO SPLIT POINTS ON EXPERTS-EXCHANGE QUESTIONS
You can split points on questions, however you need the help of Community Support to do so. What you
need to do is post a zero point question in the Community Support area by clicking on the link for Community
Support near the top left of the Experts-Exchange web page, in the EE Community section.  In the question
you need to reference this question number, who you wish to split the points among, and what point values
to assign, then Community Support staff will do the rest, normally by reducing the original point value
of this question to allow you to post new questions for the other experts.
These questions would be titled points for whomever and paste the question's  url in the comment block
so the expert would know what it was about.
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by:CrazyOne
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>>>Contacted Microsoft support who said that even if I could re-boot the machine there was no way to replace the damaged SAM file.

Yeah I figured with the SAM being damaged you would not be able to do the normal fixing routines basically because these methods usually require a password which is of course houesed in the SAM.
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by:Adam Leinss
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Just curious, why didn't you delete the SAM?  Doing so will delete all of the user accounts on the machine, but then the Administrator account would have a blank password and then you could log in (assuming the SAM was the only thing damaged).  I'm surprised Microsoft didn't recommend this to you.  
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by:CrazyOne
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Because the machine has no bootable XP CD which requires a password just to get into the Recovery Console to have access to the delete command. Since the SAM is damaged it won't allow getting to the point to enter a password. Even if it was FAT32 the system does not have a floppy drive to boot from although a bootable CD made from a Win98 boot disk would overcome this problem. The problem is chances are this is an NTFS system since it was factory installed so a Win98 boot disk wouldn't work.
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by:GUEEN
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Ditto on Crazy...
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by:centerv
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Crazy
there is more than one way to make a boot floppy and transfer to cd.

http://support.microsoft.com/search/preview.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q311073
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by:CrazyOne
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Nice link Bev. :>)
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by:CrazyOne
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Oops sorry cent I called you Bev. LOL

Sorry Bev as well. :>)
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by:centerv
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It's been one of those nights.  :>)
I'm calling it quits.
Ciao
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by:GUEEN
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Drat I have one of those nights too - drat...
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by:steague
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Hi Guys

Will arrange apoints split as follows

shekerra   100
centerv    100
stevenlewis  150
CrazyOne   150

Hope this reflects the posts made. Thanks to all though.
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by:Moondancer
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Thank you for your Community Support request, I have split these points, per your request.  First response awarded in this primary question, others await comments below by respective experts:

Points for shekerra -> http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qShow.jsp?qid=20313192
Points for centerv -> http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qShow.jsp?qid=20313193
Points for CrazyOne -> http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qShow.jsp?qid=20313194

:) Moondancer - EE Moderator
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LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:centerv
Comment Utility
Thanks and good luck.
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LVL 41

Expert Comment

by:stevenlewis
Comment Utility
Ow, I got left out :~(
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LVL 41

Expert Comment

by:stevenlewis
Comment Utility
Blush, I misread the thread LOL
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
Comment Utility
Hehehe your comment was the one accepted Steve. What was it your wife put into that drink you just had. LOL
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LVL 41

Expert Comment

by:stevenlewis
Comment Utility
Up at 5:00 am and to bed at 12:30 am makes a long day LOL
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:WiZaRd
Comment Utility
Steve, welcome to insomniacs anon.
sounds like my average day although up at 6.30am and to bed 2.00am is more like it for me!
keeps the coffee merchants in business. hehehe!
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