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Starting dual boot XP/2000 system

Posted on 2002-06-17
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
Have dual boot XP/2000 system. Installed 2000 Pro first, then XP. Did change the default OS for startup to 2000. Startup has worked fine for 2 months until yesterday. Windows 2000 Pro will start with no problem. When XP is chosen from the startup screen the following occurs:
1) The Windows 2000 startup screen appears.
2) The following message shows: "Windows 2000 could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\Config\SYSTEMd  startup options for
Windows 2000 press F8".
Ran sysedit. The config.sys and autoexec.bat files are empty.
The ONLY major things that I have done recently is to install SP2 for Windows 2000 and uninstall Easy CD Creator (done through Add-Remove Programs).

Why are the references to the problem with Windows 2000 when it is XP that won't load? Anyway, what do I need to do to restore the startup where XP will load when selected? Thank you.

             
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Question by:cactusdr
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23 Comments
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7084603
Well not sure the reason for the error pointing to Win2000 but if the problem is with that installation this might help you past the problem.

Note the following approcah will not replace any system files.

Can you boot to your Win2000 CD? If so then when it finally boots At the "Welcome to Setup" screen, press F10, or press R to repair, and then C to start the Recovery Console this will allow you to use the command line. From here do something like the following. Or if the file system is FAT32 you can use a Win98 bootdisk to do this. www.bootdisk.com

COPY /Y C:\WINNT\repair\RegBack\TheParticularHive C:\WINNT\system32\config\

This will replace the registry hive to the last time that hive was backuped. Hopefully you didn't backup the registry at the time the problems started to happen.

Following is a list of the files that are the registry hives. I would suggest starting with the SYSTEM hive and then reboot and if the problem still persists do the SOFTWARE hive next. Note these files don't have a file extension on them

DEFAULT
SAM
SECURITY
SOFTWARE
SYSTEM

I would suggest to first backup these hives from the C:\WINNT\system32\config\ to folder of your making or choice just don't back them up to the C:\WINNT\repair\RegBack\ folder.  

You will probably need to reapply any services patches that you have previously installed.
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7084610
If it is XP try this. The procedure is pretty much the same as the above mentioned method. Just do it on the SYSTEM hive only.

Maybe this MS KB article may help

http://support.microsoft.com/search/preview.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q307545

BEGIN ARTICLE

How to Recover from a Corrupted Registry that Prevents Windows XP from Starting (Q307545)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:

Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY
This article describes how to recover a Windows XP system that does not start because of corruption in the registry. This procedure does not guarantee full recovery of the system to a previous state; however, you should be able to recover data when you use this procedure.

You can repair a corrupted registry in Windows XP. Corrupted registry files can cause a variety of different error messages. Please refer to the Knowledge Base for articles regarding error messages related to registry issues.

This article assumes that normal recovery methods have failed and access to the system is not available except by using Recovery Console. If an Automatic System Recovery (ASR) backup exists, it is the preferred method for recovery; it is recommended that you use the ASR backup before you try the procedure described in this article.


MORE INFORMATION
When you try to start or restart your Windows XP-based computer, you may receive one of the following error messages:

Windows XP could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM
Windows XP could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SOFTWARE
Stop: c0000218 {Registry File Failure} The registry cannot load the hive (file): \SystemRoot\System32\Config\SOFTWARE or its log or alternate
The procedure described in this article uses Recovery Console, System Restore, and lists all the required steps in specific order to ensure that the process completes fully. After you complete this procedure, the system should return to a state very close to the system before the problem occurred. If you have ever run NTBackup and completed a system state backup, you do not have to follow the procedures in parts two and three; you can skip to part four.
Part One
In part one, you boot to the Recovery Console, create a temporary folder, back up the existing registry files to a new location, delete the registry files at their existing location, and then copy the registry files from the repair folder to the System32\Config folder. When you are finished this procedure, a registry is created that you can use to boot back into Windows XP. This registry was created and saved during the initial setup of Windows XP, so any changes and settings that took place after Setup completes are lost.

To complete part one, follow these steps:
Boot to the Recovery Console.


At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:

md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak

delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default

copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

NOTE : This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example). To create this file, run the following command when you boot into Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
The Batch command in Recovery Console allows for all the commands in a text file to be sequentially processed. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.
Part Two
In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is normally not visible during normal usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:
Start Windows Explorer.

On the Tools menu, click Folder options .

Click the View tab.

Under Hidden files and folders , click to select Show hidden files and folders , and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.

Click Yes when the dialog box is displayed that confirms that you want to display these files.

Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to get a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.

Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder appears dimmed folder because it is set as a super-hidden folder.

NOTE : This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}".

NOTE: You may receive the following error message:
C:\System Volume Information is not accessible. Access is denied.
If you get this message, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to gain access to this folder and continue with the procedure:

Q309531 How to Gain Access to the System Volume Information Folder
Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with "RP x under this folder. These are restore points.

Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder folder; the following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:

C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot
From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:

_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file created by Setup, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUID under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. This is why it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.

The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You need a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.

The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to ensure the files are available under Recovery Console. You need to use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder by default.

NOTE : The procedure described in this section assumes that you are running your computer with the FAT32 file system.
Part Three
In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Boot to Recovery Console.


At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
del c:\windows\system32\config\sam

del c:\windows\system32\config\security

del c:\windows\system32\config\software

del c:\windows\system32\config\default

del c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_software c:\windows\system32\config\software

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_system c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_machine_security c:\windows\system32\config\security

copy c:\windows\tmp\_registry_user_.default c:\windows\system32\config\default
NOTE : Some of the preceding command lines may be wrapped for readability.

NOTE : This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example).
Part Four
Click Start , and then click All Programs .

Click Accessories , and then click System Tools .

Click System Restore , and then click Restore to a previous Restore Point .

REFERENCES
For additional information about using Recovery Console, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Q307654 HOW TO: Access the Recovery Console During Startup
Q216417 How to Install the Windows XP Recovery Console
Q240831 How to Copy Files from Recovery Console to Removable Media
Q314058 Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console
For additional information about System Restore, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Q306084 HOW TO: Restore Windows XP to a Previous State
Q261716 System Restore Removes Files During a Restore Procedure

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Published Oct 24 2001 9:05AM  Issue Type kbinfo  
Last Modifed Mar 22 2002 4:49PM  Additional Query Words  
Keywords kbenv

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE  
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7084613
Also take a look at these MS KB articles listed in my last comment.

Q307654 HOW TO: Access the Recovery Console During Startup
Q216417 How to Install the Windows XP Recovery Console
Q240831 How to Copy Files from Recovery Console to Removable Media
Q314058 Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console
For additional information about System Restore, click the article numbers below to view the articles
in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Q306084 HOW TO: Restore Windows XP to a Previous State
Q261716 System Restore Removes Files During a Restore Procedure
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Expert Comment

by:sorgie
ID: 7084629
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:Ajnin
ID: 7084739
I ran into a simular problem. To resolve I booted with the XP cd to re-run the setup but chose the fast repair option instead. Be sure it is repairing the correct partition or you may lose 2000 also.

If I repeated what anyone else has said they should get the points.
Regard and let us know.
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Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7084794
Hi Ajnin where have you been? I have kind of missed seeing you around. :>)
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LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Adam Leinss
ID: 7084878
I got that exact same error message when I installed Windows 2000 _after_ XP.  Try copying NTDETECT.COM and NTLDR from the XP CD to the root directory of C:\ and see if that helps.
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7084951
cactusdr would you mind posting the contents of the boot.ini file that is being used for the multi boot? There may be something funky in it causing the problem. :>)
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Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7085100
CrazyOne et al[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect
:
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7085131
Ok thanks

Looking at this it appears there are two seperate hard drives, Correct? If so then the boot.ini looks OK. I am curious do you let the system boot from the default or do you explictly choose XP from the menu. Not sure if this makes any difference, I am just kind of thinking out load. :>)
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:pjknibbs
ID: 7086019
Is it possible that installing Win2K SP2 has updated the NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM files that aleinss mentioned? Presumably XP ain't happy booting from Win2K versions of those files...
0
 

Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7089127
CrazyOne et al[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect
:
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:Ajnin
ID: 7091053
Hey CrazyOne, thanks for the comment. I've been out in the field more often now than I use to be. Out of town for training now so wher do I go?

cactusdr, have you tried the repair option as I mentioned? aleinss has a point too. pjknibbs is probably right as to why this happened. When it happened to me, I had just ran Windows Updates for 2000 (already had SP2) then XP would say there was a problem loading 2000.

When you setup 2000 did you install it on your second hard drive and then setup XP on the first hard drive. This is atleast what your boot.ini file is saying is this true. Usually it is the other way around if you install 2000 first. (doesn't have to be but usually that is the way it is done.)

Please provide feedback as to what you have tried and the results if possible.

Regards
0
 

Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091128
Ajnin-2000 was set up on the 2nd drive (D:) then XP installed on the 1st drive (C:).  I've "attempted" the repair via the Recovery Console as outlined, but my MS-DOS abilities are terrible. I tried using the XP cd for the "fast repair option" you mentioned but can't find that option when the cd starts. I'd love to try that as I lost complete use of my right hand in January and typing in command lines is a *****! I'll keeps trying whatever you guys offer. Thanks
0
 

Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091135
One thought-Wouldn't the problem definitely be with XP as the corrupted or missing files are from \windows\system32\etc? Checked the bootcfg /default and states the XP OS is in Volume C:. Just a thought.
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Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091144
One thought-Wouldn't the problem definitely be with XP as the corrupted or missing files are from \windows\system32\etc? Checked the bootcfg /default and states the XP OS is in Volume C:. Just a thought.
0
 

Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091200
One thought-Wouldn't the problem definitely be with XP as the corrupted or missing files are from \windows\system32\etc? Checked the bootcfg /default and states the XP OS is in Volume C:. Just a thought.
0
 

Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091259
SORRY!!! for the repeat posts. I kept hitting the Refresh button while trying to hit the Home button. Guess the eyes are gone too.
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LVL 44

Accepted Solution

by:
CrazyOne earned 400 total points
ID: 7091725
Tis OK cactusdr. :>)

Umm not sure what to tell you. Win2000 seems to be throwing the error yet it is the XP install that it seems to be complaining about.

See if this helps you any
http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm
and click on "How To Repair Windows XP by Reinstalling"
0
 

Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091740
FYI - Just ran my virus scan app. The virus WORM_HYBRIS.DLL was found in C:\System Volume Information\_{406A768A-72EF-etc.} Looked up the virus and it's supposed to be benign. Possible?
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:CrazyOne
ID: 7091760
Hmmm I doubt it is the root cause of the problem.

http://www.antivirus.com/vinfo/virusencyclo/default5.asp?VName=WORM_HYBRIS.M
Description:
This non-destructive worm is a variant of TROJ_HYBRIS.C. It propagates via email, by sending itself as an attachment to every user listed in the address book of the infected user.
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Author Comment

by:cactusdr
ID: 7091851
Reinstalled as outlined and everthing works beautifully. XP even runs quicker than before. Thank you for the help from everyone. I've learned a great deal!!
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 7092499
:>)
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