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Accessing Tape Drive on Linux / Restoring Unix Tar Backup

Hello,

I have never used Unix or Linux before. I have been a Dos and Windows cronie for the last 14 years. So, bear with me while I go through pains learning Linux.

I was given a DLT 40/80 backup tape that contains a lot of MS Office documents. The tapes were backed up with Unix Tar. I would like to know how to restore the tapes using Linux. Is there an easy answer to this and how do I do it?

I have never used tar before but I have been told it is like PKZIP from the command line. Would I restore the TAR image from the backup tape and then unzip it or would restoring it from tape (using default utilities) unzip or untar it for me?

I am running Linux version 7.3 and I just ran the update to automatically update my system.

Thanks in advance,

John
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jhieb
Asked:
jhieb
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1 Solution
 
ahoffmannCommented:
tar is an archiver, only GNU's tar (gtar, the default on Linux) also can compress with gzip.

To check what's on your tape, you need to know the device of your tape drive, which is /dev/mt0 or /dev/st0, then do following to list the tape:

   tar tvf /dev/st0

The tape might be written with more than one label, means that sevaral tar commands wrote on the tape, one behind each other. Then you need to check like this:

   tar tvf /dev/nst0
   tar tvf /dev/nst0
   tar tvf /dev/nst0
   ...

To get all files back use:

   tar xf /dev/st0

to get a specific file back, use:

   tar xf /dev/st0 path/to/file/you/want
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jhiebAuthor Commented:
This stuff did not work for me. How do I get my points back?
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jhiebAuthor Commented:
I am making a request to have this question deleted in the community forum.
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MindphaserCommented:
My personal feeling here is that you were given a very valid answer (I am a UNIX person myself). You never gave ahoffmann any feedback what didn't work so he would be able to help you any more.

** Mindphaser - Community Support Moderator **
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ahoffmannCommented:
still listening ..
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jhiebAuthor Commented:
This did not work for me and I sent the tape to a vendor instead. As I noted, I am not a Unix person. These items may have made sense to someone who is used to Unix and a Unix person could probably have adjusted the response to make it work. But for me, it did not work and I paid someone else to do the work for me. Thanks anyway.
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MindphaserCommented:
OK, that's feedback ... I'd like to keep ahofmann's comment around. Therefor I will refund the the points and move the question to PAQ.

** Mindphaser - Community Support Moderator **
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ahoffmannCommented:
agreed (even if the paid person used my comment to make it work)
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MindphaserCommented:
I hope they paid somebody who'd know without EE's help :-)
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jhiebAuthor Commented:
Ha! Nice try. I paid someone who does this for a living. Thanks for your help, anyway.
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ahoffmannCommented:
aha, a slave, please hand over ;-)
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MindphaserCommented:
I hope the guy's name who does it isn't "A. Hoffmann" ...
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