Solved

Delete nested folder in JSP?

Posted on 2002-07-01
6
348 Views
Last Modified: 2010-07-27
How to delete a nested folder that contains files/sub folders in JSP?

thanks.
0
Comment
Question by:trowa
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mraible
ID: 7121845
Same way you would in java.

Look at java.io.File in the Javadocs.

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/api/java/io/File.html

You should be able to delete a file or directory with the "delete" method.
0
 
LVL 19

Accepted Solution

by:
cheekycj earned 50 total points
ID: 7121885
I found this in a FAQ:

public void nuke(File path)
   throws IOException
{
   File[] files = path.listFiles();

   for(int i=0; i<files.length; ++i)
   {
      if(files[i].isDirectory())
         nuke(files[i]);

      files[i].delete();
   }
}

its pretty much a recursive method that will delete a directory and all its files and sub-dirs.

call it using:
nuke("/path/to/dir/to/delete");

HTH,
CJ
0
 

Author Comment

by:trowa
ID: 7126368
CJ, thanks again. The nuke function above work well, but it didn't delete the folder itself. Let's say:

i call nuke("\a");

all the sub-folder and files in a folder is deleted, but the a folder itself is not deleted.

Maybe you can show me how to delete the a folder also inside the Nuke function above.

and why when i compare a String value, i must use:

if (strvalue.equals("abc")) {
//
}

but not if (strvalue == "abc") {
//
}

?

Is this the syntax of Java? what's their difference?

Thanks :)
0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:cheekycj
ID: 7127040
you can just after you call the nuke function do this:

nuke(path);
File dirToDelete = new File(path);
path.delete();

string1.equals(string2) or even
string1.equalsIgnoreCase(string2) are the way to compare strings in java b/c the String object has those methods implemented to compare the values whereas the "==" operator on Objects (Strings are Objects) compares if the two objects are pointing to the same memory reference.  Big Difference :-)

Here is a good link that explains this:
http://www.michael-thomas.com/java/javacert/JCP_ObjectEqual.htm

HTH,
CJ

0
 

Author Comment

by:trowa
ID: 7131361
Thanks a lot again, CJ :)
0
 
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:cheekycj
ID: 7131762
Glad I could help and Thanx for the "A".

CJ
0

Featured Post

Ready to get started with anonymous questions?

It's easy! Check out this step-by-step guide for asking an anonymous question on Experts Exchange.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

First of all let me say that the only language that I speak is English, but in answering questions here I often come across people whose English skills are not the best and I’d like to be able to communicate better with them, and the following descr…
Part One of the two-part Q&A series with MalwareTech.
In this video, viewers will be given step by step instructions on adjusting mouse, pointer and cursor visibility in Microsoft Windows 10. The video seeks to educate those who are struggling with the new Windows 10 Graphical User Interface. Change Cu…
Monitoring a network: why having a policy is the best policy? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the enormous benefits of having a policy-based approach when monitoring medium and large networks. Software utilized in this v…

615 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question