solar /tmp and swap

Posted on 2002-07-01
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2013-12-27
   I have a solaris 8 with 2GB RAM and have allocate
2GB of swap swap on disk0:
can someone please explain the following outputs -thanks-

df -k /tmp shows:
Filesystem    kbytes    used   avail capacity Mounted on
swap          3519584     440 3519144     1%    /tmp

swap -s shows:
total: 158776k bytes allocated + 14208k reserved = 172984k used, 3521128k available

Q1.  How come /tmp show as 3519684KB allocated?  I thought the server has 2GB RAM and it has allocated 2GB swap allocated, shouldn't it total allocated is 4GB instead of 3.5GB?

Q2.  on swap -s, what are these two values mean?
158776k bytes allocated + 14208k reserved
where is 158776k coming from and 14208k coming from?

thanks in advance

Question by:siunix
LVL 51

Accepted Solution

ahoffmann earned 400 total points
ID: 7122863
Solaris mount /tmp on the swap partition of your disk.
This means in practice, that the swap area shares the same space with the /tmp filesystem. So if /tmp increases, swap decrises and vice versa.
The size of your initial swap partition can only be seen in format. The values printe by df and swap, added and/or subtracted properly, give you the size of your partition and/or swap area.

BTW, this behaviour (/tmp on swap) is the reason why Solaris always ever clears /tmp at boot time :-)
LVL 15

Expert Comment

ID: 7123839

ahoffman is right about that:

See a PAQ: http://www.experts-exchange.com/jsp/qManageQuestion.jsp?ta=solaris&qid=10441857

I had the same confusion before.


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